Viral transmission

Viral transmission is the process by which viruses spread between hosts. It includes spread to members of the same host species or spread to different species in the case of viruses that can cross species barriers.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research
    | Open Access

    Alphaviruses need to selectively package genomic viral RNA for transmission, but the packaging mechanism remains unclear. Here, Brown et al. combine PAR-CLIP with biotinylated capsid protein (Cp) retrieval and identify multiple Cp binding sites on genomic viral RNA that promote virion formation.

    • Rebecca S. Brown
    • , Dimitrios G. Anastasakis
    • , Markus Hafner
    •  & Margaret Kielian
  • Research
    | Open Access

    SARS-CoV-2 mainly transmits via respiratory droplets. Here Deng et al. show that SARS-CoV-2 can infect rhesus macaques via ocular conjunctival inoculation.

    • Wei Deng
    • , Linlin Bao
    • , Hong Gao
    • , Zhiguang Xiang
    • , Yajin Qu
    • , Zhiqi Song
    • , Shuran Gong
    • , Jiayi Liu
    • , Jiangning Liu
    • , Pin Yu
    • , Feifei Qi
    • , Yanfeng Xu
    • , Fengli Li
    • , Chong Xiao
    • , Qi Lv
    • , Jing Xue
    • , Qiang Wei
    • , Mingya Liu
    • , Guanpeng Wang
    • , Shunyi Wang
    • , Haisheng Yu
    • , Ting Chen
    • , Xing Liu
    • , Wenjie Zhao
    • , Yunlin Han
    •  & Chuan Qin
  • Research
    | Open Access

    Influenza viruses are believed to transmit through the air as respiratory droplets or aerosols. In the guinea pig model, Asadi et al. show that influenza virus can also be transmitted as aerosolized fomites, which are microscopic dust particles stirred up from a virus-contaminated environment.

    • Sima Asadi
    • , Nassima Gaaloul ben Hnia
    • , Ramya S. Barre
    • , Anthony S. Wexler
    • , William D. Ristenpart
    •  & Nicole M. Bouvier
  • Research
    | Open Access

    SARS-CoV-2 has rapidly spread globally and animal models to study transmission are needed. Here, Richard et al. show efficient transmission of SARS-CoV-2 between ferrets via direct contact and via the air, through respiratory droplets and/or aerosols.

    • Mathilde Richard
    • , Adinda Kok
    • , Dennis de Meulder
    • , Theo M. Bestebroer
    • , Mart M. Lamers
    • , Nisreen M. A. Okba
    • , Martje Fentener van Vlissingen
    • , Barry Rockx
    • , Bart L. Haagmans
    • , Marion P. G. Koopmans
    • , Ron A. M. Fouchier
    •  & Sander Herfst
  • Research |

    A new epidemiological study shows reduced susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 and decreased risk of developing severe symptoms in people aged younger than 20 years, suggesting that children have limited contribution to spread of COVID-19.

    • Nicholas G. Davies
    • , Petra Klepac
    • , Yang Liu
    • , Kiesha Prem
    • , Mark Jit
    • , Carl A. B. Pearson
    • , Billy J. Quilty
    • , Adam J. Kucharski
    • , Hamish Gibbs
    • , Samuel Clifford
    • , Amy Gimma
    • , Kevin van Zandvoort
    • , James D. Munday
    • , Charlie Diamond
    • , W. John Edmunds
    • , Rein M. G. J. Houben
    • , Joel Hellewell
    • , Timothy W. Russell
    • , Sam Abbott
    • , Sebastian Funk
    • , Nikos I. Bosse
    • , Yueqian Fiona Sun
    • , Stefan Flasche
    • , Alicia Rosello
    • , Christopher I. Jarvis
    •  & Rosalind M. Eggo
    Nature Medicine 26, 1205-1211
  • Research |

    The pathogenicity and transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in golden (Syrian) hamsters resemble features of COVID-19 in human patients, suggesting that these hamsters could be used to model this disease.

    • Sin Fun Sia
    • , Li-Meng Yan
    • , Alex W. H. Chin
    • , Kevin Fung
    • , Ka-Tim Choy
    • , Alvina Y. L. Wong
    • , Prathanporn Kaewpreedee
    • , Ranawaka A. P. M. Perera
    • , Leo L. M. Poon
    • , John M. Nicholls
    • , Malik Peiris
    •  & Hui-Ling Yen
    Nature 583, 834-838

News and Comment

  • Editorial |

    As the international community responds to an outbreak of coronavirus-induced pneumonia in Wuhan, China, early and open data sharing — which are vital for its control — depend on the trust that the data will not be used without proper attribution to those who generated it.

    Nature Microbiology 5, 227-228
  • News and Views |

    Baloxavir marboxil (BXM) represents a promising advance in antiviral chemotherapies for influenza infections. Identification of transmissible BXM-resistant strains in Japan may hit pause on widespread adoption of this therapy and could lead to revision of surveillance practices for emerging viruses.

    • Karen A. Kormuth
    •  & Seema S. Lakdawala
  • Editorial |

    Long-known to happen in other realms of the microscopic and macroscopic worlds, social interactions in viruses are increasingly being appreciated and have the potential to influence many processes, including viral pathogenesis, resistance to antiviral immunity, establishment of persistence and even life cycle choice.