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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research
    | Open Access

    Understanding the synchronization of human networks is important in many aspects, but current research is suffering from limited control and noisy environments. Shahal et al. show a quantitative study with full control over the network connectivity, coupling strength and delay among interacting violin players.

    • Shir Shahal
    • , Ateret Wurzberg
    • , Inbar Sibony
    • , Hamootal Duadi
    • , Elad Shniderman
    • , Daniel Weymouth
    • , Nir Davidson
    •  & Moti Fridman
  • Reviews
    | Open Access

    Current environmental impact mitigation neglects over-consumption from affluent citizens as a primary driver. The authors highlight the role of bottom-up movements to overcome structural economic growth imperatives spurring consumption by changing structures and culture towards safe and just systems.

    • Thomas Wiedmann
    • , Manfred Lenzen
    • , Lorenz T. Keyßer
    •  & Julia K. Steinberger
  • Research |

    Phosphorus cycling pathways and their ability to withstand disturbances are crucial to sustainable and sufficient food production. Ecological network analysis applied to a multi-node cycling network in China reveals the sensitivities and entry points for closing the phosphorus cycle.

    • Sai Liang
    • , Yadong Yu
    • , Ali Kharrazi
    • , Brian D. Fath
    • , Cuiyang Feng
    • , Glen T. Daigger
    • , Shaoqing Chen
    • , Tieju Ma
    • , Bing Zhu
    • , Zhifu Mi
    •  & Zhifeng Yang
    Nature Food 1, 365-375
  • Research
    | Open Access

    Great progress toward the education-related SDG targets has been made; however, global estimates of within-country distributions of education reveal gender disparities and high levels of total inequality in many parts of the world.

    • Joseph Friedman
    • , Hunter York
    • , Nicholas Graetz
    • , Lauren Woyczynski
    • , Joanna Whisnant
    • , Simon I. Hay
    •  & Emmanuela Gakidou
    Nature 580, 636-639
  • Research
    | Open Access

    The partial effects of saving rate changes on CO2 emissions remain unclear. Here the authors found that the increase in saving rates of China has led to increments of global industrial CO2 emissions by 189 million tonnes (Mt) during 2007-2012, while global CO2 emissions would be reduced by 186 Mt if the saving rates of China decreased by 15 percentage points.

    • Chen Lin
    • , Jianchuan Qi
    • , Sai Liang
    • , Cuiyang Feng
    • , Thomas O. Wiedmann
    • , Yihan Liao
    • , Xuechun Yang
    • , Yumeng Li
    • , Zhifu Mi
    •  & Zhifeng Yang

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