Scientific community and society articles within Nature

Featured

  • Editorial |

    General science meetings are good opportunities for researchers to broaden their horizons.

  • Editorial |

    Young scientists at a Chinese genomics institute are foregoing conventional postgraduate training for the chance to be part of major scientific initiatives. Is this the way of the future?

  • News Feature |

    Georgia's borders are guarded by some of the best radiation detectors available — so why are nuclear smugglers still slipping through? Sharon Weinberger reports.

    • Sharon Weinberger
  • Opinion |

    The US Congress should discourage efforts to advance the technology to make fuel for nuclear reactors, say Francis Slakey and Linda R. Cohen — the risks outweigh the benefits.

    • Francis Slakey
    •  & Linda R. Cohen
  • Careers and Recruitment |

    Concerns about food shortages, land use, climate change and biodiversity have created a huge need for interdisciplinary researchers focused on agriculture. Virginia Gewin investigates the opportunities.

    • Virginia Gewin
  • Futures |

    Different business models for difficult times.

    • Dan Erlanson
  • Books & Arts |

    Joanna Cole has authored more than 100 science books for children, including the best-selling Magic School Bus series, the latest edition of which tackles the topic of climate change. In the last of our series of interviews with authors who write science books for different audiences, Cole reveals how clarity and colour can introduce even very young children to science.

    • Nicola Jones
  • News |

    Systems for ranking the world's higher-education and research institutions are about to become more sophisticated, says Declan Butler.

    • Declan Butler
  • News Feature |

    The bold ambitions of one institute could make China the world leader in genome sequencing. David Cyranoski asks if its science will survive the industrial ramp-up.

    • David Cyranoski
  • News |

    Launching the European Research Council was a Herculean effort, says its outgoing president.

    • Natasha Gilbert
  • Letter |

    Social science hypotheses suggest that humans prefer more equality in outcome distributions because the knowledge of inequality reduces the reward experience. Here, functional MRI was used to test directly for inequality-averse social preferences in the brain during monetary transfers between pairs of participants and an experimenter. The results indicate that the brain's reward circuitry is sensitive to distribution inequality and is actively modulated relative to context.

    • Elizabeth Tricomi
    • , Antonio Rangel
    •  & John P. O’Doherty
  • Editorial |

    Industry talent should be welcomed into academia, not seen as a corrupting influence.

  • News |

    Funding agency cuts number of publications needed for grant applications.

    • Quirin Schiermeier
  • Editorial |

    The new European research commissioner deserves political support from member states of the European Union to drastically reduce the dead weight of Brussels bureaucracy.

  • Editorial |

    Turkey's government is about to pass legislation that could cripple the country's biological research.

  • Prospects |

    Negotiating for a pay rise can be a smooth, fruitful process if you follow a few guidelines, says Deb Koen.

    • Deb Koen
  • News |

    A survey reveals how Chinese scientists could be affected by the stand-off between their government and the search-engine giant.

    • Jane Qiu
  • Books & Arts |

    A history of intellectual-property rights reveals how the pirating of ideas and goods has transformed science publishing, drug development and software, explains Michael Gollin.

    • Michael Gollin
  • Futures |

    A fine romance.

    • Julian Tang
  • Careers Q&A |

    In January, Zhenrong Zhang obtained her first faculty position as an assistant professor, at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. She will set up Baylor's first scanning tunnelling microscopy lab.

    • Virginia Gewin
  • Opinion |

    After five years, the World Health Organization's tobacco-control treaty is starting to have an effect, but we need to tackle the smoking epidemic in the developing world, say Jonathan M. Samet and Heather L. Wipfli.

    • Jonathan M. Samet
    •  & Heather L. Wipfli
  • Books & Arts |

    Acclaimed biographer Georgina Ferry has chronicled the lives of two Nobel prizewinning chemists, Dorothy Hodgkin and Max Perutz. In the fourth in our series of five interviews with authors who each write science books for a different audience, Ferry reveals how detachment is needed to turn an attic's worth of personal letters into a compelling story.

    • Nicola Jones
  • News & Views |

    A mathematical method has been developed that distinguishes between the paintings of Pieter Bruegel the Elder and those of his imitators. But can the approach be used to spot imitations of works by any artist?

    • Bruno A. Olshausen
    •  & Michael R. DeWeese
  • Letter |

    Peptide hormones such as oxytocin and vasopressin influence social behaviour in several mammalian species. Here it is shown that a population of interneurons in the rat olfactory bulb releases vasopressin, and that vasopressin signalling is required in the olfactory system for proper social recognition in rats. Although vasopressin may not work in exactly the same way in humans, social recognition mediated by experience-dependent vasopressin release may be common.

    • Vicky A. Tobin
    • , Hirofumi Hashimoto
    •  & Mike Ludwig