Population genetics

Population genetics is the study of the genetic composition of populations, including distributions and changes in genotype and phenotype frequency in response to the processes of natural selection, genetic drift, mutation and gene flow.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • Research Highlights |

    A study in Nature analysing genome-wide variation in individuals from islands across Polynesia reports evidence of admixture with Native Americans related to Indigenous inhabitants of northern South America.

    • Linda Koch
  • Research Highlights |

    Structural variants have proved difficult to characterize using traditional sequencing approaches. In two new studies in Cell, the authors demonstrate the use of pan-genome approaches to identify and explore the impact of structural variants in crop genomes and reveal variants linked to specific agronomic traits.

    • Joseph Willson
  • Research Highlights |

    Ostendorf et al. show that germline variants of human APOE play a role in melanoma that is opposite to that in Alzheimer disease, with APOE4 carrier status being associated with reduced melanoma growth in mice and improved outcome in patients with advanced melanoma.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • Research Highlights |

    During ageing, many normal human tissues become a patchwork of mutant clones. Colom et al. show that, in mutagenized mouse oesophageal epithelium, this mutational landscape arises through cell competition, with clone fitness determined by the genotype of their neighbours.

    • Dorothy Clyde
  • Research Highlights |

    A collection of seven articles from the gnomAD consortium, published in Nature, Nature Medicine and Nature Communications, showcases analyses of global human genetic variation in coding and non-coding genomic regions across this data set.

    • Linda Koch