Parasite evolution

  • Article | | open

    The evolution of within-host malaria virulence has been studied, but the vector’s contribution isn’t well understood. Here, Costa et al. show that non-competitive parasitic resource exploitation within-vector, in particular lipid trafficking, restricts within-host infectivity and virulence of the parasite.

    • G. Costa
    • , M. Gildenhard
    • , M. Eldering
    • , R. L. Lindquist
    • , A. E. Hauser
    • , R. Sauerwein
    • , C. Goosmann
    • , V. Brinkmann
    • , P. Carrillo-Bustamante
    •  & E. A. Levashina
  • Article | | open

    Unlike chimpanzees and gorillas, bonobos have not been found infected by malaria parasites in the wild. Here, Liu et al. report more thorough survey and sequencing results showing that bonobos host malaria parasites, including a yet-unknown species, but only in the eastern-most part of their range.

    • Weimin Liu
    • , Scott Sherrill-Mix
    • , Gerald H. Learn
    • , Erik J. Scully
    • , Yingying Li
    • , Alexa N. Avitto
    • , Dorothy E. Loy
    • , Abigail P. Lauder
    • , Sesh A. Sundararaman
    • , Lindsey J. Plenderleith
    • , Jean-Bosco N. Ndjango
    • , Alexander V. Georgiev
    • , Steve Ahuka-Mundeke
    • , Martine Peeters
    • , Paco Bertolani
    • , Jef Dupain
    • , Cintia Garai
    • , John A. Hart
    • , Terese B. Hart
    • , George M. Shaw
    • , Paul M. Sharp
    •  & Beatrice H. Hahn
  • Article | | open

    Unbiased identification of proteins from pathogens that are exposed to a host can provide insight into host–pathogen interaction. Here, the authors use an enzymatic tagging method and mass spectrometry to identify rapidly evolving Nematocida microsporidia proteins when infecting C. elegans.

    • Aaron W. Reinke
    • , Keir M. Balla
    • , Eric J. Bennett
    •  & Emily R. Troemel
  • Article | | open

    African apes harbour six Plasmodium species, one of which gave rise to the human malaria parasite. Here, Sundaraman et al. use selective whole-genome amplification to determine genome sequences from two chimpanzee Plasmodium species, shedding light on the evolutionary origin of the human parasite.

    • Sesh A. Sundararaman
    • , Lindsey J. Plenderleith
    • , Weimin Liu
    • , Dorothy E. Loy
    • , Gerald H. Learn
    • , Yingying Li
    • , Katharina S. Shaw
    • , Ahidjo Ayouba
    • , Martine Peeters
    • , Sheri Speede
    • , George M. Shaw
    • , Frederic D. Bushman
    • , Dustin Brisson
    • , Julian C. Rayner
    • , Paul M. Sharp
    •  & Beatrice H. Hahn
  • Article | | open

    Trichinellosis is a globally important food-borne disease caused by roundworms of the Trichinella complex. Here the authors present genomic sequences representing all 12 recognized Trichinella species and genotypes, and reconstruct their phylogeny and biogeography.

    • Pasi K. Korhonen
    • , Edoardo Pozio
    • , Giuseppe La Rosa
    • , Bill C. H. Chang
    • , Anson V. Koehler
    • , Eric P. Hoberg
    • , Peter R. Boag
    • , Patrick Tan
    • , Aaron R. Jex
    • , Andreas Hofmann
    • , Paul W. Sternberg
    • , Neil D. Young
    •  & Robin B. Gasser
  • Article | | open

    Antigens encoded by var genes are major virulence factors of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Here, Larremore et al. identify var-like genes in distantly related Plasmodium species infecting African apes, indicating that these genes already existed in an ancestral ape parasite many millions of years ago.

    • Daniel B. Larremore
    • , Sesh A. Sundararaman
    • , Weimin Liu
    • , William R. Proto
    • , Aaron Clauset
    • , Dorothy E. Loy
    • , Sheri Speede
    • , Lindsey J. Plenderleith
    • , Paul M. Sharp
    • , Beatrice H. Hahn
    • , Julian C. Rayner
    •  & Caroline O. Buckee
  • Article | | open

    Plasmodium falciparum, known to cause malaria in humans, evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here, the authors compare the genome of the human parasite, P. falciparum, with those of two related chimpanzee parasites, P. reichenowi and P. gaboni, and provide insight into the genetic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts.

    • Thomas D. Otto
    • , Julian C. Rayner
    • , Ulrike Böhme
    • , Arnab Pain
    • , Natasha Spottiswoode
    • , Mandy Sanders
    • , Michael Quail
    • , Benjamin Ollomo
    • , François Renaud
    • , Alan W. Thomas
    • , Franck Prugnolle
    • , David J. Conway
    • , Chris Newbold
    •  & Matthew Berriman
  • Article |

    Plasmodium vivax, the leading cause of human malaria in Asia and Latin America, is thought to have an Asian origin. Here, the authors show that wild chimpanzees and gorillas in Africa are infected with parasites that are closely related to P. vivax, indicating an African origin for this species.

    • Weimin Liu
    • , Yingying Li
    • , Katharina S. Shaw
    • , Gerald H. Learn
    • , Lindsey J. Plenderleith
    • , Jordan A. Malenke
    • , Sesh A. Sundararaman
    • , Miguel A. Ramirez
    • , Patricia A. Crystal
    • , Andrew G. Smith
    • , Frederic Bibollet-Ruche
    • , Ahidjo Ayouba
    • , Sabrina Locatelli
    • , Amandine Esteban
    • , Fatima Mouacha
    • , Emilande Guichet
    • , Christelle Butel
    • , Steve Ahuka-Mundeke
    • , Bila-Isia Inogwabini
    • , Jean-Bosco N. Ndjango
    • , Sheri Speede
    • , Crickette M. Sanz
    • , David B. Morgan
    • , Mary K. Gonder
    • , Philip J. Kranzusch
    • , Peter D. Walsh
    • , Alexander V. Georgiev
    • , Martin N. Muller
    • , Alex K. Piel
    • , Fiona A. Stewart
    • , Michael L. Wilson
    • , Anne E. Pusey
    • , Liwang Cui
    • , Zenglei Wang
    • , Anna Färnert
    • , Colin J. Sutherland
    • , Debbie Nolder
    • , John A. Hart
    • , Terese B. Hart
    • , Paco Bertolani
    • , Amethyst Gillis
    • , Matthew LeBreton
    • , Babila Tafon
    • , John Kiyang
    • , Cyrille F. Djoko
    • , Bradley S. Schneider
    • , Nathan D. Wolfe
    • , Eitel Mpoudi-Ngole
    • , Eric Delaporte
    • , Richard Carter
    • , Richard L. Culleton
    • , George M. Shaw
    • , Julian C. Rayner
    • , Martine Peeters
    • , Beatrice H. Hahn
    •  & Paul M. Sharp
  • Article | | open

    Recent work has shown that the transmission of malaria from mosquito to human is inefficient. In this study, an analysis of published literature is used to understand this inefficiency, which is likely due to heterogeneous biting, where 20% of people receive 80% of the bites.

    • David L. Smith
    • , Chris J. Drakeley
    • , Christinah Chiyaka
    •  & Simon I. Hay