Mechanical and structural properties and devices

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research
    | Open Access

    Here, the authors report water as a superior platform to suspend graphene compared to solid substrates that induce non-uniformity and do not provide structural flexibility. They utilize confocal Raman spectroscopy to study graphene floating freely on the surface of water to show that a liquid support relieves the pre-existing strain.

    • Liubov A. Belyaeva
    • , Lin Jiang
    • , Alireza Soleimani
    • , Jeroen Methorst
    • , H. Jelger Risselada
    •  & Grégory F. Schneider
  • Research
    | Open Access

    Reinforcing polymers with carbon-based nanofillers is non-trivial due to incompatibilities between matrix and filler. Here, the authors report highly reinforced graphene oxide–aramid nanocomposites utilizing a water-based hybrid biaxial nematic mixture.

    • Maruti Hegde
    • , Lin Yang
    • , Francesco Vita
    • , Ryan J. Fox
    • , Renee van de Watering
    • , Ben Norder
    • , Ugo Lafont
    • , Oriano Francescangeli
    • , Louis A. Madsen
    • , Stephen J. Picken
    • , Edward T. Samulski
    •  & Theo J. Dingemans
  • Research |

    Mechanical fatigue occurs under cyclic stress much lower than the tensile strength, but this has not been investigated for 2D materials. Here, graphene is found to have a fatigue life of 109 cycles.

    • Teng Cui
    • , Sankha Mukherjee
    • , Parambath M. Sudeep
    • , Guillaume Colas
    • , Farzin Najafi
    • , Jason Tam
    • , Pulickel M. Ajayan
    • , Chandra Veer Singh
    • , Yu Sun
    •  & Tobin Filleter
  • Research
    | Open Access

    The extraordinary mechanical properties of graphene are usually measured on very small or supported samples. Here, the authors develop a method to test a large area of graphene and show that even with edge defects it displays near-ideal mechanical performance.

    • Ke Cao
    • , Shizhe Feng
    • , Ying Han
    • , Libo Gao
    • , Thuc Hue Ly
    • , Zhiping Xu
    •  & Yang Lu
  • Research |

    The bending stiffness of few-layer graphene is shown to decrease significantly with the bending angle due to shear and slip between the atomic layers, which culminate in superlubric behaviour as the bending angle further increases.

    • Edmund Han
    • , Jaehyung Yu
    • , Emil Annevelink
    • , Jangyup Son
    • , Dongyun A. Kang
    • , Kenji Watanabe
    • , Takashi Taniguchi
    • , Elif Ertekin
    • , Pinshane Y. Huang
    •  & Arend M. van der Zande

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