Macrophages

Blood monocytes that enter damaged tissues from the circulation differentiate into macrophages. These specialised phagocytic cells recognise, engulf and degrade cellular debris and pathogens and can survive several months. They function both in innate and adaptative immunity and are also essential for wound healing processes.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research
    | Open Access

    Multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) are important in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Here, the authors demonstrate that extracellular presence of the amino acid arginine is required for MGC formation and metabolism, suggesting a translational impact for strategies utilizing systemic arginine depletion in MGC-mediated diseases.

    • Julia S. Brunner
    • , Loan Vulliard
    • , Melanie Hofmann
    • , Markus Kieler
    • , Alexander Lercher
    • , Andrea Vogel
    • , Marion Russier
    • , Johanna B. Brüggenthies
    • , Martina Kerndl
    • , Victoria Saferding
    • , Birgit Niederreiter
    • , Alexandra Junza
    • , Annika Frauenstein
    • , Carina Scholtysek
    • , Yohei Mikami
    • , Kristaps Klavins
    • , Gerhard Krönke
    • , Andreas Bergthaler
    • , John J. O’Shea
    • , Thomas Weichhart
    • , Felix Meissner
    • , Josef S. Smolen
    • , Paul Cheng
    • , Oscar Yanes
    • , Jörg Menche
    • , Peter J. Murray
    • , Omar Sharif
    • , Stephan Blüml
    •  & Gernot Schabbauer
  • Reviews |

    Macrophages are the gatekeepers of intestinal immune homeostasis. This Review discusses the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the differentiation and function of intestinal macrophages in homeostasis and inflammation, and their role in resolving the inflammatory process.

    • Yi Rang Na
    • , Michelle Stakenborg
    • , Seung Hyeok Seok
    •  & Gianluca Matteoli
  • Research
    | Open Access

    Fibrosis is a hallmark of several cardiac pathologies and its underlying mechanisms are still poorly defined. Here the authors show that macrophage hypoxia signaling following transverse aortic constriction in mice suppresses the activation of cardiac fibroblasts by secreting oncostatin M.

    • Hajime Abe
    • , Norihiko Takeda
    • , Takayuki Isagawa
    • , Hiroaki Semba
    • , Satoshi Nishimura
    • , Masaki Suimye Morioka
    • , Yu Nakagama
    • , Tatsuyuki Sato
    • , Katsura Soma
    • , Katsuhiro Koyama
    • , Masaki Wake
    • , Manami Katoh
    • , Masataka Asagiri
    • , Michael L. Neugent
    • , Jung-whan Kim
    • , Christian Stockmann
    • , Tomo Yonezawa
    • , Ryo Inuzuka
    • , Yasushi Hirota
    • , Koji Maemura
    • , Takeshi Yamashita
    • , Kinya Otsu
    • , Ichiro Manabe
    • , Ryozo Nagai
    •  & Issei Komuro
  • Reviews |

    In this Review, Greg Lemke explains how macrophages are able to sense and respond to dead and dying cells. The author discusses the physiological implications of such macrophage activity.

    • Greg Lemke
  • Research
    | Open Access

    Control of macrophage adhesion and phenotype is important to biomaterial applications. Here, the authors report on the use of bisphosphonate coated gold nanoparticles by magnesium coordination for the controlled adhesion and polarisation of macrophages in vitro and in vivo and controlled cell release.

    • Heemin Kang
    • , Boguang Yang
    • , Kunyu Zhang
    • , Qi Pan
    • , Weihao Yuan
    • , Gang Li
    •  & Liming Bian
  • Research
    | Open Access

    Following muscle damage, an inflammatory response is associated to activation of satellite cells, which drive muscle repair. Here, the authors show that upregulation of Zeb1 in macrophages and muscle fibres regulates inflammation, and also show a role for Zeb1 in maintenance of satellite cell quiescence.

    • Laura Siles
    • , Chiara Ninfali
    • , Marlies Cortés
    • , Douglas S. Darling
    •  & Antonio Postigo

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