Limnology

  • Article
    | Open Access

    A large fraction of ice sheet discharge enters the ocean subsurface from underneath large floating ice-tongues. Here the authors show that associated nutrient export may be governed by shelf circulation and, especially for Fe, particle-dissolved phase exchanges, which is largely independent from freshwater Fe content.

    • Stephan Krisch
    • , Mark James Hopwood
    •  & Eric Pieter Achterberg
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Clean water is a fundamental resource, yet the economic impacts of pollution, drinking water availability, and greenhouse gas emissions from freshwaters are unknown. Here the authors combine models with economic assessments and find trillions of dollars in savings by mitigating lake methane emissions.

    • John A. Downing
    • , Stephen Polasky
    •  & Stephen C. Newbold
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Understanding the past is necessary to comprehend Earth’s response to present climate change, but past climate reconstruction is hampered by a lack of temperature proxies. Here the authors develop the HDI26, a proxy using cyanobacterial glycolipids to reconstruct water temperatures of lakes worldwide.

    • Thorsten Bauersachs
    • , James M. Russell
    •  & Lorenz Schwark
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Stratification has a considerable influence on lake ecology, but there is little understanding of past or future changes in its seasonality. Here, the authors use modelling and empirical data to determine that between 1901–2099, climate change causes stratification to start earlier and end later.

    • R. Iestyn Woolway
    • , Sapna Sharma
    •  & Eleanor Jennings
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The conditions that shaped Earth’s evolution during the Archaean and Proterozoic Eons remain unknown. Using Lake Towuti in Indonesia as an analog of early oceans the authors find that microbial methanogenesis exerts a strong influence with important implications for the composition of Earth’s early atmosphere.

    • André Friese
    • , Kohen Bauer
    •  & Jens Kallmeyer
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Anthropogenic changes, such as eutrophication from lake pollution, can lead to rapid evolution. Comparing Daphnia resurrected from generations adapted to historical pollution to contemporary, post-cleanup populations finds that Daphnia rapidly reversed their evolved resistance to harmful cyanobacteria.

    • Jana Isanta-Navarro
    • , Nelson G. Hairston Jr
    •  & Dominik Martin-Creuzburg
  • Article
    | Open Access

    This study presents hourly data from a thermistor string in Lake Michigan, inspecting its response at depth to surface warming. Based on the data, the study suggests bottom lake temperatures respond to changes in turnover and re-stratification, with the ultimate possibility of the lake shifting from dimictic to monomictic.

    • Eric J. Anderson
    • , Craig A. Stow
    •  & Nathan Hawley
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Enigmatic blooms of phytoplankton in aquatic oxygen-deficient zones could exacerbate depletion of nitrogen. Here the authors perform stable isotope experiments on the oxygen-deficient waters of Lake Tanganyika in Africa, finding that blooms drive down fixed nitrogen and could expand as a result of climate change.

    • Cameron M. Callbeck
    • , Benedikt Ehrenfels
    •  & Carsten J. Schubert
  • Article
    | Open Access

    How the abrupt warming events recorded in Greenland ice cores during the last glacial cycle have influenced the tropical climate is not well known. Here the authors present new lake sediment data from the Peruvian Andes that shows that these events resulted in rapid glacier retreat and large reductions in lake level.

    • Arielle Woods
    • , Donald T. Rodbell
    •  & Joseph S. Stoner
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Sedimentary DNA can be used to infer how organisms responded to changing environmental conditions over millennia. Here, the authors use sedimentary DNA of micro-eukaryotes in low-elevation (human-impacted) and high-elevation (more pristine) lakes to show how human influences have altered lake community composition in the Anthropocene.

    • François Keck
    • , Laurent Millet
    •  & Isabelle Domaizon
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Global environmental changes threaten many food-producing sectors, including aquaculture. Here the authors show that countries most vulnerable to climate change will probably face the highest antimicrobial resistance in aquaculture-related bacteria, and that infected aquatic animals have higher mortality at warmer temperatures.

    • Miriam Reverter
    • , Samira Sarter
    •  & Rodolphe E. Gozlan
  • Article
    | Open Access

    High latitude droughts are increasing, but their effects on freshwater systems are poorly understood. Here the authors investigate Sweden’s most severe drought in the last century and show that these dry conditions induce hypoxia and elevated methane production from streams.

    • Lluís Gómez-Gener
    • , Anna Lupon
    •  & Ryan A. Sponseller
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Water temperature is a critical variable for lakes, but its spatial and temporal patterns are not well characterised globally. Here, the authors use surface temperature dynamics to define lake thermal regions that group lakes with similar patterns, and show how these regions shift under climate change.

    • Stephen C. Maberly
    • , Ruth A. O’Donnell
    •  & Andrew N. Tyler
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The variations in overbank flow from rivers onto floodplains from regional to continental scales are understudied. Here, the authors investigate this variation as a function of hydroclimatic parameters and channel size in the conterminous U.S. and find that the timing of floodplain inundation is largely controlled by regional factors, while the frequency, duration and magnitude of these inundations vary consistently with channel size.

    • Durelle T. Scott
    • , Jesus D. Gomez-Velez
    •  & Judson W. Harvey
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Rivers are thought to be the largest source of the recalcitrant and abundant black carbon in the ocean. Here, Wagner and colleagues find distinct pools of black carbon between rivers and the open ocean, challenging the long-held assumption that marine black carbon is of terrestrial origin.

    • Sasha Wagner
    • , Jay Brandes
    •  & Aron Stubbins
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The Western Siberia Lowland (WSL) is the world’s largest frozen peatland complex, however carbon emissions (CO2+CH4) from lakes in this region remain unknown. Here, the authors sample 76 lakes and show high carbon emissions from lakes across all permafrost zones in the WSL.

    • S. Serikova
    • , O. S. Pokrovsky
    •  & J. Karlsson
  • Article
    | Open Access

    .Agricultural intensification and a growing human population are likely to increase the eutrophication of lakes and impoundments over the next century.  Here, the authors show that this enhanced eutrophication will substantially increase emissions of methane (+ 30–90%), a potent greenhouse gas, from these systems over the next century.

    • Jake J. Beaulieu
    • , Tonya DelSontro
    •  & John A. Downing
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Permafrost carbon feedback modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to greenhouse gas emissions that accelerate climate change. Here the authors show that deeper, abrupt thaw beneath lakes will more than double radiative forcing from permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century.

    • Katey Walter Anthony
    • , Thomas Schneider von Deimling
    •  & Guido Grosse
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Methane emissions from lakes vary by orders of magnitude, leaving large uncertainty in regional and global carbon budgets. Here the authors show that phenols from forest litter act as a latch to suppress microbial activity and produce over 400-times less methane than the decomposition of aquatic plant litter.

    • E. J. S. Emilson
    • , M. A. Carson
    •  & A. J. Tanentzap
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The effect of Asian summer monsoon hydrological changes on key biogeochemical processes remains poorly understood. Here, using a suite of biomarkers, the authors reconstruct palaeohydrological conditions during the Holocene and show that the peatland carbon cycle is strongly sensitive to paleohydrological changes.

    • Xianyu Huang
    • , Richard D. Pancost
    •  & Shucheng Xie
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Arctic ecosystems are at threat due to the rapid nature of climate change and Arctic amplification. Here, the authors show that the watershed of Lake Hazen, the Arctic’s largest lake by volume, has undergone dramatic changes in response to as little as a ~1°C increase in summer air temperatures.

    • Igor Lehnherr
    • , Vincent L. St. Louis
    •  & Charles H. Talbot
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Species richness patterns are driven by biotic and abiotic factors, the relative strengths of which are unclear. Here, the authors test how species interactions or environmental traits influence fish richness across over 700 Canadian lakes, showing a surprisingly small role of negative interactions.

    • Andrew S. MacDougall
    • , Eric Harvey
    •  & Kevin S. McCann
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The magnitude of organic carbon burial in lakes and reservoirs is poorly constrained. Here, using a compilation of modern data from the literature and statistical modeling, the authors estimate a global yearly organic carbon burial of 0.15 Pg C in inland waters, of which 40% is stored in reservoirs.

    • Raquel Mendonça
    • , Roger A. Müller
    •  & Sebastian Sobek
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The contribution of methane (CH4) produced in oxic freshwaters to the global atmospheric CH4 budget is poorly constrained. Here, using a mass balance and in-situ incubations, the authors show that significant CH4 emissions are supported by CH4 produced in the oxic surface mixed layer in Lake Hallwil.

    • D. Donis
    • , S. Flury
    •  & D. F. McGinnis
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The question of how significant barite deposits were able to form from early Earth’s low-sulfate seas remains controversial. Here, the authors show pelagic barite precipitation within a strongly barite-undersaturated ecosystem, highlighting the importance of particle-associated microenvironments.

    • Tristan J. Horner
    • , Helena V. Pryer
    •  & Richard D. Ricketts
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The impacts of climate change on the Great Lakes’ ecosystems compared to historical records are unclear. Here, using paleolimnological evidence, the authors show that Lake Superior experienced a slow increase in productivity throughout the Holocene, but that this rate has increased in the last century.

    • M. D. O’Beirne
    • , J. P. Werne
    •  & E. D. Reavie
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Changes in penguin populations on the Antarctic Peninsula in recent decades have been linked to environmental factors such as sea ice. Here, the authors show that penguin colony change on Ardley Island, NW Antarctic Peninsula during the last 8,500 years was primarily driven by volcanic activity.

    • Stephen J. Roberts
    • , Patrick Monien
    •  & Dominic A. Hodgson
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Climate change can affect lake water level and nearby landscape. Korosi and colleagues show recent expansion of shallow lakes in the Canadian Northwest Territories is flooding critical habitat for the wood bison, and demonstrate the trickle-down effect of climate change on ecosystem functioning.

    • Jennifer B. Korosi
    • , Joshua R. Thienpont
    •  & Jules M. Blais
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Increased temperature and nutrient pollution are key features of anthropogenic change, but their dual effects on biodiversity remain unclear. Here Wanget al. conduct field experiments at two mountain elevation gradients to show that temperature and nutrients have independent and interactive effects on microbial diversity.

    • Jianjun Wang
    • , Feiyan Pan
    •  & Ji Shen
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Lakes play a key role in our ecosystems and thus it is vital to understand their distribution and volume. Here, the authors present a new global lake database (HydroLAKES) and develop a new geo-statistical model to show global lake area, shoreline length, water volume and hydraulic residence times.

    • Mathis Loïc Messager
    • , Bernhard Lehner
    •  & Oliver Schmitt
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Due to increasing disturbance of peatlands, Southeast Asian rivers are thought to play a major role in the transfer of CO2to the atmosphere. Here, the authors present data collected from six Indonesian and Malaysian rivers and show that the region is not an outgassing hotspot as previously assumed.

    • Francisca Wit
    • , Denise Müller
    •  & Tim Rixen