Golgi

  • Article
    | Open Access

    The Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 has a C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Here the authors show that this tail binds trafficking machinery via sequences that appear optimised to ensure that Spike accumulates at the site of viral budding in the Golgi but that some can also traffic to the cell surface to induce syncytia formation.

    • Jérôme Cattin-Ortolá
    • , Lawrence G. Welch
    •  & Sean Munro
  • Article
    | Open Access

    COPA regulates Golgi to ER transport, and mutations lead to autoinflammation and disease through poorly understood mechanisms. Here, the authors show that disease-causing COPA variants prevent STING transport from the Golgi to the ER, leading to cGAS-independent activation of the STING pathway.

    • Kojiro Mukai
    • , Emari Ogawa
    •  & Tomohiko Taguchi
  • Article
    | Open Access

    p53 mutants can promote tumorigenesis by affecting fundamental cellular pathways and functions. In this study, the authors demonstrate a novel mutant-p53/HIF1α/miR-30d axis that impacts Golgi structure, trafficking, and secretion of proteins essential for tumor growth and metastasis.

    • Valeria Capaci
    • , Lorenzo Bascetta
    •  & Giannino Del Sal
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Correct Golgi assembly is important to cellular homeostasis but regulation of its structure under stress remains unclear. Here, the authors identify stress-induced degradation of GM130 by Golgi-localized 26S proteasomes, leading to Golgi dispersal.

    • Avital Eisenberg-Lerner
    • , Ron Benyair
    •  & Yifat Merbl
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Golgi disassembly is required for mitosis and occurs by vesicle fusion suppression, although the mechanism is unclear. Here, Chang et al. show, with quantitative analyses and crystallography, that Importin-α regulates this process by blocking GM130-p115 interactions in a Ran pathway-independent way.

    • Chih-Chia Chang
    • , Ching-Jou Chen
    •  & Kuo-Chiang Hsia
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Intracellular vesicle transport can be regulated by Brefeldin‐A ADP‐Ribosylated Substrate (BARS) during vesicle fission. Here, the authors show that NADH generated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1) inhibits intracellular transport by targeting BARS and inhibiting COPI vesicle fission during situations of energy deprivation

    • Jia-Shu Yang
    • , Jia-Wei Hsu
    •  & Victor W. Hsu
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Cytoplasmic PTEN is a tumor suppressor that antagonises PI3K signalling. Here, the authors show that nuclear PTEN can interact with the spliceosomal proteins and drive pre-mRNA splicing in a phosphatase-independent manner, in particular, PTEN depletion promotes Golgi extension and secretion through GOLGA2 exon skipping.

    • Shao-Ming Shen
    • , Yan Ji
    •  & Guo-Qiang Chen
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) are suggested to efficiently transport hydrolases by continuous cycling. Here, the authors use a nanobody-epitope interaction-based labeling approach to trace VSR recycling from the TGN/EE to the cis-Golgi and reveal ligand reloading of recycled VSRs.

    • Simone Früholz
    • , Florian Fäßler
    •  & Peter Pimpl
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Actin and microtubules play important roles in Golgi structure and function but how they are connected is poorly understood. Here the authors show that KIF20A is involved in the fission process and, in association with Myosin II, serves to anchor RAB6 on Golgi/TGN membranes near microtubules nucleating sites.

    • Stéphanie Miserey-Lenkei
    • , Hugo Bousquet
    •  & Bruno Goud
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Microtubule organization requires γ-tubulin ring complexes (γTuRCs), but the mechanisms that control γTuRC-mediated microtubule nucleation are unclear. Here the authors show that the DNA polymerase δ catalytic subunit controls noncentrosomal γTuRC activity and regulates the organization of Golgi-derived microtubules.

    • Yuehong Shen
    • , Pengfei Liu
    •  & Robert Z. Qi
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The different composition of Golgi cisternae gave rise to two different models for intra-Golgi traffic: one where stable cisternae communicate via vesicles and another one where cisternae biochemically mature to ensure anterograde transport. Here, the authors provide evidence in support of the stable compartments model.

    • Myun Hwa Dunlop
    • , Andreas M. Ernst
    •  & James E. Rothman
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The anterograde movement of Golgi-derived vesicles requires the small GTPase RAB6, while its effector ELKS targets these vesicles to particular areas of the plasma membrane. Here the authors show that RAB6 and ELKS function in the biogenesis of melanosome, demonstrating that the secretory pathway can be directed towards intracellular organelles of endosomal origin.

    • Anand Patwardhan
    • , Sabine Bardin
    •  & Cédric Delevoye
  • Article
    | Open Access

    VPS15 is known as a VPS34-associated protein that functions in intracellular trafficking and autophagy. Here the authors identify a role for VPS15 in ciliopathy and ciliary phenotypes, and show that it interacts with GM130 and functions in IFT20-dependent cis-Golgi to cilium trafficking.

    • Corinne Stoetzel
    • , Séverine Bär
    •  & Hélène Dollfus
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Sphingolipids in the trans-Golgi network have been implicated in polar trafficking. Here Wattelet-Boyer et al. show that hydroxylated C24- and C26-acyl-chain sphingolipids are enriched in trans-Golgi network subdomains that are critical for polar sorting of the PIN2 auxin carrier in plant cells.

    • Valérie Wattelet-Boyer
    • , Lysiane Brocard
    •  & Yohann Boutté
  • Article
    | Open Access

    STING is essential for the type I interferon immune response to foreign DNA. Here, the authors show that palmitoylation of STING at the Golgi is required for activating downstream signalling, and increased Golgi localization of certain STING variants may cause autoimmune disease in some cases.

    • Kojiro Mukai
    • , Hiroyasu Konno
    •  & Tomohiko Taguchi
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Cellulose is produced in plants by cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) that are assembled in the endomembrane system and then trafficked to the plasma membrane. Here Zhang et al. show that the Golgi-localized STELLO1 and 2 proteins are required for the proper assembly and distribution of CSCs in plant cells.

    • Yi Zhang
    • , Nino Nikolovski
    •  & Paul Dupree
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The Golgi mitotic checkpoint couples Golgi inheritance with cell cycle transition, and regulates centrosomal recruitment of the mitotic kinase Aurora-A. Here the authors show that upon Golgi ribbon fragmentation in G2, Src phosphorylates Aurora-A at the Golgi, driving its localization to the centrosomes.

    • Maria Luisa Barretta
    • , Daniela Spano
    •  & Antonino Colanzi
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Polycystins (PC) 1 and 2 are large transmembrane proteins that play a vital role in the function of primary cilia. Here, Kim et al. identify the requirements for polycystin trafficking to the cilium, involving a PC1–PC2 interaction, PC1 proteolytic cleavage and a specific trafficking module at the trans-Golgi network.

    • Hyunho Kim
    • , Hangxue Xu
    •  & Feng Qian
  • Article |

    Microtubules that nucleate from the surface of the Golgi network are important for polarized trafficking and cell migration. Sato et al.find that these microtubules are crosslinked and stabilized by the microtubule-binding protein MTCL1, and show that this activity is required for Golgi structure and function.

    • Yoshinori Sato
    • , Kenji Hayashi
    •  & Atsushi Suzuki
  • Article |

    Polarized membrane addition during axon development requires post-Golgi Rab10 carriers, whose biogenesis mechanisms remain unknown. This work shows that specific interaction between Rab10 and MYO5B controls formation of the Rab10 carriers, and this process is essential for neuronal polarization.

    • Yang Liu
    • , Xiao-Hui Xu
    •  & Zhen-Ge Luo
  • Article |

    COG complexes are thought to be involved in tethering of intra-Golgi vesicles. Here the authors show that individual COG complex subunits direct the assembly of distinct vesicle-tethering platforms, suggesting that COG subunits have a role in the specificity of vesicular sorting.

    • Rose Willett
    • , Tetyana Kudlyk
    •  & Vladimir Lupashin
  • Article |

    The Golgi membrane is fragmented during mitosis and is subsequently fused following cell division and this process is known to be controlled by ubiquitination. In this study, the ubiquitin ligase HACE1 is shown to be targeted to the Golgi membrane and is required for fusion after the completion of mitosis.

    • Danming Tang
    • , Yi Xiang
    •  & Yanzhuang Wang