Feeding behaviour

  • Article
    | Open Access

    Calcitonin receptor-expressing neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to long-term control of food intake and body weight. The authors show that a subset of these cells expresses Prlh and that enhancing Prlh-mediated neurotransmission from the NTS dampens hypothalamically-driven hyperphagia and obesity in mice.

    • Wenwen Cheng
    • , Ermelinda Ndoka
    •  & Martin G. Myers Jr
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in neurofibromin and associated with disruptions in physiology and behavior. Here the authors show that neurofibromin regulates metabolic homeostasis via a discrete brain circuit in a Drosophila model of NF1.

    • Valentina Botero
    • , Bethany A. Stanhope
    •  & Seth M. Tomchik
  • Article
    | Open Access

    During the expansion of adipose tissue adipocyte progenitor cells proliferate and undergo adipogenesis. Here, the authors show that adipocyte progenitor cell proliferation in visceral adipose tissue has a diurnal pattern, which is dependent on both energy intake and the circadian clock.

    • Aleix Ribas-Latre
    • , Rafael Bravo Santos
    •  & Kristin L. Eckel-Mahan
  • Review Article
    | Open Access

    Circadian clocks link physiologic processes to environmental conditions and a mismatch between internal and external rhythms has negative effects on organismal health. In this review, the authors discuss the interactions between circadian clocks and dietary interventions targeted to promote healthy aging.

    • Victoria A. Acosta-Rodríguez
    • , Filipa Rijo-Ferreira
    •  & Joseph S. Takahashi
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Hedonic feeding occurs in the absence of metabolic need and plays a critical role in the excessive feeding that underlies obesity. The authors show that optogenetic manipulation of NAc inputs from the prefrontal cortex versus inputs from the anterior paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus has opposite effects on high fat intake.

    • Daniel J. Christoffel
    • , Jessica J. Walsh
    •  & Robert C. Malenka
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) has been recently identified as an endogenous regulator of appetite. Here, using pancreatic cancer as a model of cachexia, the authors demonstrate that LCN2 is a critical mediator of cancer-associated anorexia and may be therapeutically targeted to improve patient outcomes.

    • Brennan Olson
    • , Xinxia Zhu
    •  & Daniel L. Marks
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Catecholaminergic neurons of the ventrolateral medulla are known to drive diverse glucose counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia. Here, the authors show that projections from these neurons onto nucleus accumbens-targeting neurons of the midline thalamus selectively mediate hypoglycemic feeding.

    • B. Sofia Beas
    • , Xinglong Gu
    •  & Mario A. Penzo
  • Article
    | Open Access

    How the developmental capacity of long-lived animals copes with fluctuations in the food supply is unclear. Here, the authors show using the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis that the crosstalk between Target of Rapamycin and fibroblast growth factor signalling in ring muscles links postembryonic tentacle patterning with food availability.

    • Aissam Ikmi
    • , Petrus J. Steenbergen
    •  & Matthew C. Gibson
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Overnutrition is associated with hypothalamic ER stress and impaired leptin signaling. Here the authors show that ER stress already occurs in neonates and that treatment with the ER stress relieving drug TUDCA early in life has beneficial metabolic and neurodevelopmental effects.

    • Soyoung Park
    • , Aleek Aintablian
    •  & Sebastien G. Bouret
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Food intake can be attenuated by visceral aversive stimuli in pathological conditions. Here the authors identify a unilateral neural circuit from the CamKII-positive neurons in the anterior insular cortex to the vGluT2-positive neurons in the lateral hypothalamus that controls feeding responses to visceral aversive stimuli.

    • Yu Wu
    • , Changwan Chen
    •  & Shuang Qiu
  • Article
    | Open Access

    AgRP-expressing neurons regulate feeding, glucose homeostasis and locomotor activity, but the neurotransmitters that mediate these effects are unclear. Here the authors show that neuropeptide Y in these neurons regulates rapid feeding responses and insulin sensitivity, but not locomotor activity.

    • Linda Engström Ruud
    • , Mafalda M. A. Pereira
    •  & Jens C. Brüning
  • Article
    | Open Access

    AgRP neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) are involved in regulating hunger and energy balance. Here the authors show that knockout of the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a in AgRP neurons of the ARH leads to a reduction in voluntary exercise along with numerous epigenetic and gene expression changes in ARH neurons.

    • Harry MacKay
    • , C. Anthony Scott
    •  & Robert A. Waterland
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Hunger modulates perception of good and bad tastes. Here, the authors report that orexigenic AgRP neurons in the hypothalamus mediate these effects through glutamatergic lateral hypothalamic neurons that send distinct projections to the lateral septum and lateral habenula.

    • Ou Fu
    • , Yuu Iwai
    •  & Ken-ichiro Nakajima
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The relationship between metabolomic and behavioral changes is not well understood. Here, the authors analyze metabolome changes in D. melanogaster heads and bodies during hunger and satiety, and develop the Flyscape tool to visualize the resulting metabolic networks and integrate them with other omics data.

    • Daniel Wilinski
    • , Jasmine Winzeler
    •  & Monica Dus
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Neurons expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) regulate food intake and body weight. Here the authors show that Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1 (SRC-1) regulates the function of Pomc expressing neurons, and that rare heterozygous variants found in obese individuals lead to loss of SRC-1 function.

    • Yongjie Yang
    • , Agatha A. van der Klaauw
    •  & Yong Xu
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is released from intestinal L-cells following nutrient uptake and enhances insulin release as well as promotes satiety. Here, the authors demonstrate that GLP-1 secreting cells release ATP and that this stimulates nodose neurons and enterocytes in a paracrine manner in vitro.

    • Van B. Lu
    • , Juraj Rievaj
    •  & Frank Reimann
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Reduction in food intake elicits neuroendocrine adaptations to counterregulate the negative energy balance, e.g. via reduction in leptin levels. Here, the authors identify an additional starvation signal, growth hormone (GH). Blocking GH receptor attenuates the fall of whole body energy expenditure during food deprivation in mice.

    • Isadora C. Furigo
    • , Pryscila D. S. Teixeira
    •  & J. Donato Jr
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Obesity is associated with altered N-acylethanolamine levels (NAE). Here the authors show that deletion of the gene encoding N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D, a key enzyme for NAE synthesis, in intestinal cells of mice leads to the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis via a mechanism involving the gut-brain axis.

    • Amandine Everard
    • , Hubert Plovier
    •  & Patrice D. Cani
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) producing neurons regulate food intake and metabolic processes in peripheral organs. Here, the authors show that hypothalamic AgRP neurons alter whole body substrate utilization to favour carbohydrate usage and lipid storage.

    • João Paulo Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque
    • , Jeremy Bober
    •  & Marcelo O. Dietrich
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Developing new technologies for the neuromodulation of the vagus nerve can enable therapeutic strategies for body weight control in obese patients. Here, the authors present a battery-free self-powered implantable vagus nerve stimulation system that electrically responds to stomach movement.

    • Guang Yao
    • , Lei Kang
    •  & Xudong Wang
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The molecular pathway(s) driving antipsychotics (AP) induced hyperphagia remains unclear. A novel C. elegans system is used here to screen for FDA approved drugs that selectively suppresses this response, unraveling potential molecular mediators influencing AP induced hyperphagia in mouse models.

    • Anabel Perez-Gomez
    • , Maria Carretero
    •  & Michael Petrascheck
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Endocannabinoid signaling regulates food intake and is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. Here the authors show that adipocyte O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is required for high fat diet-induced hyperphagia via transcriptional activation of de novo lipid desaturation and accumulation of an endogenous appetite-inducing cannabinoid.

    • Min-Dian Li
    • , Nicholas B. Vera
    •  & Xiaoyong Yang
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Excess caloric intake leads to increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, to limit weight gain. Here, the authors show that neuropeptide FF receptor-2 signalling promotes thermogenesis via control of NPY expression in the arcuate nucleus, and that it absence in mice leads to a failure of activation of diet-induced thermogenesis and the development of exacerbated obesity.

    • Lei Zhang
    • , Chi Kin Ip
    •  & Herbert Herzog
  • Article
    | Open Access

    In the ventral basal ganglia circuit, the ventral pallidum (VP) receives major inputs from the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and is involved in reward processing. Here, the authors report that, contrary to the accepted model, signals related to the relative value of reward in VP emerge before NAc and are more robust.

    • David Ottenheimer
    • , Jocelyn M. Richard
    •  & Patricia H. Janak
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Feeding-relevant vagal signaling occurs between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain, but it is unclear if this pathway influences cognitive processes. This study shows that endogenous gastrointestinal derived vagal sensory signaling promotes hippocampal-dependent memory function via a multi-order brainstem–septal pathway.

    • Andrea N. Suarez
    • , Ted M. Hsu
    •  & Scott E. Kanoski
  • Article
    | Open Access

    μ-opioid signalling has a known role in the response to various rewarding stimuli, including pleasant foods. Here, Nummenmaa et al. show using PET and fMRI that individual differences in brain μ-opioid receptor density predict the strength of the neural response to highly palatable foods in humans

    • Lauri Nummenmaa
    • , Tiina Saanijoki
    •  & Kari Kalliokoski
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Feeding disorders are often comorbid with compulsive behaviours but the underlying neural circuits are not known. Here the authors demonstrate that glutamatergic and GABAergic projections from the LH to the PVH exert antagonistic effects on grooming and feeding via modulation of PVH neuron activity.

    • Leandra R. Mangieri
    • , Yungang Lu
    •  & Qingchun Tong
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Melanocortin receptor accessory protein 2 (MRAP2) is an adaptor protein that contributes to melanocortin-4 receptor and prokineticin receptor 1 signalling. Here the authors show that MRAP2 also regulates ghrelin receptor signalling in the hypothalamus and starvation sensing in mice.

    • Dollada Srisai
    • , Terry C. Yin
    •  & Julien A. Sebag
  • Article
    | Open Access

    MANF is a neurotrophic factor that is secreted but also mediates the unfolded protein response acting intracellularly. Here, the authors show that MANF expression in the brain is influenced by nutritional cues, and hypothalamic MANF influences food intake and systemic energy homeostasis.

    • Su Yang
    • , Huiming Yang
    •  & Xiao-Jiang Li
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The influence of insulin on food preference and the corresponding underlying neural circuits are unknown in humans. Here, the authors show that increasing insulin changes food preference by modulating mesolimbic neural circuits, and that this pattern is changed in insulin-resistant individuals.

    • Lena J. Tiedemann
    • , Sebastian M. Schmid
    •  & Stefanie Brassen
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The mechanism by which caffeine, an antagonist of adenosine receptors, regulates metabolism is not clear. Here the authors show that adenosine A1R receptor expression is increased in the hypothalamus of diet-induced obesity mice, and that body weight can be alleviated by central administration of caffeine via its action on hypothalamic oxytocin neurons.

    • Liufeng Wu
    • , Jia Meng
    •  & Guo Zhang
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Hypothalamus is important for regulating feeding behaviour. Here the authors report genetic identification of neurons in the pretecto-hypothalamic circuit, and their causal involvement in prey detection and prey capture, using a combination of functional imaging and ablation studies in freely swimming zebrafish larvae.

    • Akira Muto
    • , Pradeep Lal
    •  & Koichi Kawakami
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying food texture detection are poorly understood. Here the authors show thatDrosophilacan discriminate food texture when feeding, and that this ability depends on NOMPC, a mechanosensory channel expressed in gustatory sensilla neurons.

    • Juan Antonio Sánchez-Alcañiz
    • , Giovanna Zappia
    •  & Richard Benton
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Protein feeding is known to induce strong inhibition on further food intake, though the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, the authors identify a protein-specific satiety hormone inDrosophila, and show that it suppresses feeding via promoting DILP2 release in the central nervous system.

    • Jinghan Sun
    • , Chang Liu
    •  & Yan Li
  • Article
    | Open Access

    It is well known that alcohol consumption leads to overeating however the neural mechanisms are unclear. Here the authors demonstrate that hunger promoting Agrp neurons in hypothalamus are also activated by ethanol and are necessary for ethanol-induced overeating.

    • Sarah Cains
    • , Craig Blomeley
    •  & Denis Burdakov
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Feeding control requires the integration and coordination of motivational, sensory and motor circuits in the brain. Here, the authors discover a set of neurons that regulate feeding inDrosophilaby promoting insulin release, and whose activity reflects physiological hunger and satiety states of flies.

    • Yin Peng Zhan
    • , Li Liu
    •  & Yan Zhu