DNA computing and cryptography

  • Article
    | Open Access

    Storage technology based on DNA is emerging as an information dense and durable medium. Here the authors use machine learning-based encoding and hybridization probes to execute similarity searches in a DNA database.

    • Callista Bee
    • , Yuan-Jyue Chen
    •  & Luis Ceze
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Encoding data in DNA is a promising approach to high density data storage. Here the authors present a prototype sequencing-free method that uses the spatial orientation of DNA strands with super-resolution microscopy readout.

    • George D. Dickinson
    • , Golam Md Mortuza
    •  & William L. Hughes
  • Review Article
    | Open Access

    DNA has the potential to store vast amounts of data but it is subject to physical decay. In this Perspective, the authors propose that the stability of DNA should be a key consideration in how it is used for data storage.

    • Karishma Matange
    • , James M. Tuck
    •  & Albert J. Keung
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Large volumes of true random numbers are needed for increasing requirements of secure data encryption. Here the authors use the stochastic nature of DNA synthesis to obtain millions of gigabytes of unbiased randomness.

    • Linda C. Meiser
    • , Julian Koch
    •  & Robert N. Grass
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The chemical stability of DNA makes complete erasure of DNA-encoded data difficult. Here the authors mix true and false messages, differentiated by whether a truth marker oligo is bound to it, and show that brief exposure to elevated temperatures randomizes the binding of truth markers preventing data recovery.

    • Jangwon Kim
    • , Jin H. Bae
    •  & David Yu Zhang
  • Article
    | Open Access

    DNA is an attractive digital data storing medium due to high information density and longevity. Here the authors use millions of sequences to investigate inherent biases in DNA synthesis and PCR amplification.

    • Yuan-Jyue Chen
    • , Christopher N. Takahashi
    •  & Karin Strauss
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The physical architectures of information storage dictate how data is encoded, organised and accessed. Here the authors use DNA with a single-strand overhang as a physical address to access specific data and do in-storage file operations in a scalable and reusuable manner.

    • Kevin N. Lin
    • , Kevin Volkel
    •  & Albert J. Keung
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Current synthetic DNA-based data storage systems have high recording costs, read-write latency and error-rates that make them uncompetitive compared to traditional digital storage. The authors use nicks in native DNA to encode data in parallel and create access sites for in-memory computations.

    • S. Kasra Tabatabaei
    • , Boya Wang
    •  & Olgica Milenkovic
  • Perspective
    | Open Access

    Synthetic biology uses cells as its computing substrate, often based on the genetic circuit concept. In this Perspective, the authors argue that existing synthetic biology approaches based on classical models of computation limit the potential of biocomputing, and propose that living organisms have under-exploited capabilities.

    • Lewis Grozinger
    • , Martyn Amos
    •  & Angel Goñi-Moreno
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Adoption of DNA as a data storage medium could be accelerated with specialized synthesis processes and codecs. The authors describe TdT-mediated DNA synthesis in which data is stored in transitions between non-identical nucleotides and the use of synchronization markers to provide error tolerance.

    • Henry H. Lee
    • , Reza Kalhor
    •  & George M. Church