Consanguinity

  • Article
    | Open Access

    Little is known about how human parental relatedness varied across ancient populations. Runs of homozygosity (ROH) in the offspring’s genome can give clues. Here, the authors present a method to identify ROH in ancient genomes and infer low rates of close kin unions across most ancient populations.

    • Harald Ringbauer
    • , John Novembre
    •  & Matthias Steinrücken
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Homozygosity mapping is a useful tool for identifying candidate mutations in recessive conditions, however application to next generation sequencing data has been sub-optimal. Here, the authors present AutoMap, which efficiently identifies runs of homozygosity in whole exome/genome sequencing data.

    • Mathieu Quinodoz
    • , Virginie G. Peter
    •  & Carlo Rivolta
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The prevalence of cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) is increasing rapidly across Africa. Here, the authors investigate autozygosity in CMD-associated traits in over 10,000 sub-Saharan African individuals, showing these traits are influenced by sex-specific inbreeding depression and environmental interactions.

    • Francisco C. Ceballos
    • , Scott Hazelhurst
    •  & Michèle Ramsay
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Inbreeding depression has been observed in many different species, but in humans a systematic analysis has been difficult so far. Here, analysing more than 1.3 million individuals, the authors show that a genomic inbreeding coefficient (FROH) is associated with disadvantageous outcomes in 32 out of 100 traits tested.

    • David W Clark
    • , Yukinori Okada
    •  & James F Wilson
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Mating between first or second-degree relatives is prohibited in most countries, yet it occurs and is under-studied. Here, Yengo et al. use large runs of homozygosity from the UK Biobank resource to provide DNA-based quantification of extreme inbreeding and its consequence for health and other complex traits.

    • Loic Yengo
    • , Naomi R. Wray
    •  & Peter M. Visscher