Climate-change mitigation

Climate-change mitigation encompasses policies and activities intended to reduce the greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Key intervention points include: the reduction of greenhouse gas sources, for example by reducing deforestation; emissions, for instance low carbon energy generation; and enhancing greenhouse gas sinks, for example by changes in land use.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    There lacks model comparison of global land use change projections. Here the authors explored how different long-term drivers determine land use and food availability projections and they showed that the key determinants population growth and improvements in agricultural efficiency.

    • Elke Stehfest
    • , Willem-Jan van Zeist
    • , Hugo Valin
    • , Petr Havlik
    • , Alexander Popp
    • , Page Kyle
    • , Andrzej Tabeau
    • , Daniel Mason-D’Croz
    • , Tomoko Hasegawa
    • , Benjamin L. Bodirsky
    • , Katherine Calvin
    • , Jonathan C. Doelman
    • , Shinichiro Fujimori
    • , Florian Humpenöder
    • , Hermann Lotze-Campen
    • , Hans van Meijl
    •  & Keith Wiebe
  • Research |

    Urgent action is needed to ensure food security and mitigate climate change. Through a multi-model comparison exercise, this study shows the potential negative trade-offs between food security and climate change mitigation if mitigation policies are carelessly designed.

    • Shinichiro Fujimori
    • , Tomoko Hasegawa
    • , Volker Krey
    • , Keywan Riahi
    • , Christoph Bertram
    • , Benjamin Leon Bodirsky
    • , Valentina Bosetti
    • , Jessica Callen
    • , Jacques Després
    • , Jonathan Doelman
    • , Laurent Drouet
    • , Johannes Emmerling
    • , Stefan Frank
    • , Oliver Fricko
    • , Petr Havlik
    • , Florian Humpenöder
    • , Jason F. L. Koopman
    • , Hans van Meijl
    • , Yuki Ochi
    • , Alexander Popp
    • , Andreas Schmitz
    • , Kiyoshi Takahashi
    •  & Detlef van Vuuren
  • Research | | open

    Aerosol impacts have not been comprehensively considered in the cost-benefit integrated assessment models that are widely used to analyze climate policy. Here the authors account for these impacts and find that the health co-benefits from improved air quality outweigh the co-harms from increased near-term warming, and that optimal climate policy results in immediate net benefits globally.

    • Noah Scovronick
    • , Mark Budolfson
    • , Francis Dennig
    • , Frank Errickson
    • , Marc Fleurbaey
    • , Wei Peng
    • , Robert H. Socolow
    • , Dean Spears
    •  & Fabian Wagner

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