Cancer microenvironment

The cancer microenvironment, or tumour microenvironment, describes the non-cancerous cells present in the tumour. These include fibroblasts, immune cells and cells that comprise the blood vessels. It also includes the proteins produced by all of the cells present in the tumour that support the growth of the cancer cells.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • Research Highlights |

    Esposito et al. describe a mechanism for the simultaneous induction of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and stem cell traits in disseminating breast cancer cells in the bone, and provide therapeutic opportunities to prevent initiation of bone metastasis.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • Research Highlights |

    Three studies have delved into the molecular mechanisms behind the metabolic reprogramming of tumour-associated macrophages, which have consequences for tumour progression and therapeutic response and resistance.

    • Anna Dart
  • Research Highlights |

    In a study published in Nature Medicine, Malehmir et al. have identified how platelet recruitment contributes to the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in response to high-fat diets in mice.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • Research Highlights |

    In a study published in Nature, Obradović et al. have identified that breast cancer progression in mice is associated with increased levels of stress hormones resulting in activation of the glucocorticoid receptor at secondary sites, enhanced colonization and decreased survival.

    • Anna Dart