Biogeochemistry

  • Article | | open

    It is unclear whether CO2-stimulation of photosynthesis can propagate through slower ecosystem processes and lead to long-term increases in terrestrial carbon. Here the authors show that CO2-stimulation of photosynthesis leads to a 30% increase in forest regrowth over a decade of CO2 enrichment.

    • Anthony P. Walker
    • , Martin G. De Kauwe
    • , Belinda E. Medlyn
    • , Sönke Zaehle
    • , Colleen M. Iversen
    • , Shinichi Asao
    • , Bertrand Guenet
    • , Anna Harper
    • , Thomas Hickler
    • , Bruce A. Hungate
    • , Atul K. Jain
    • , Yiqi Luo
    • , Xingjie Lu
    • , Meng Lu
    • , Kristina Luus
    • , J. Patrick Megonigal
    • , Ram Oren
    • , Edmund Ryan
    • , Shijie Shu
    • , Alan Talhelm
    • , Ying-Ping Wang
    • , Jeffrey M. Warren
    • , Christian Werner
    • , Jianyang Xia
    • , Bai Yang
    • , Donald R. Zak
    •  & Richard J. Norby
  • Article | | open

    Historical and future trends in net primary productivity (NPP) and its sensitivity to global change are largely unknown because of the lack of long-term, high-resolution data. Here the authors show that tree-ring isotopes can be used for inferring interannual variability and long-term changes in NPP.

    • Mathieu Levesque
    • , Laia Andreu-Hayles
    • , William Kolby Smith
    • , A. Park Williams
    • , Martina L. Hobi
    • , Brady W. Allred
    •  & Neil Pederson
  • Article | | open

    Abandoned and degraded agricultural lands undergo ecological succession that sequesters atmospheric CO2 as soil carbon, but at low rates. Here the authors show that restoration of high plant diversity provides a greenhouse gas benefit by greatly increasing the rate of soil carbon sequestration on such lands.

    • Yi Yang
    • , David Tilman
    • , George Furey
    •  & Clarence Lehman
  • Article | | open

    Oxidation of magnetite has broad implications in geochemistry and environmental science, but its reaction mechanisms are not fully understood yet. Here the authors use Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to show oxidative dissolution of magnetite inducing a rich array of strain and defect structures.

    • Ke Yuan
    • , Sang Soo Lee
    • , Wonsuk Cha
    • , Andrew Ulvestad
    • , Hyunjung Kim
    • , Bektur Abdilla
    • , Neil C. Sturchio
    •  & Paul Fenter
  • Article | | open

    Fire-derived organic matter (OM) is present throughout the environment, and its impact on nutrient cycling remains poorly understood. Here, the authors show that this pyrogenic OM can retain large quantities of ammonia through covalent bond formation, thereby exerting an important control on nitrogen cycling.

    • Rachel Hestrin
    • , Dorisel Torres-Rojas
    • , James J. Dynes
    • , James M. Hook
    • , Tom Z. Regier
    • , Adam W. Gillespie
    • , Ronald J. Smernik
    •  & Johannes Lehmann
  • Article | | open

    Ferromanganese minerals are abundant in marine environments but the extent of these minerals in subseafloor sediments remains unknown. Here the authors find abundant ferromanganese microparticles in oxic pelagic clays, accounting for 14–16% of the new estimate of the global manganese budget (9.2–47.4 Tt).

    • Go-Ichiro Uramoto
    • , Yuki Morono
    • , Naotaka Tomioka
    • , Shigeyuki Wakaki
    • , Ryoichi Nakada
    • , Rota Wagai
    • , Kentaro Uesugi
    • , Akihisa Takeuchi
    • , Masato Hoshino
    • , Yoshio Suzuki
    • , Fumito Shiraishi
    • , Satoshi Mitsunobu
    • , Hiroki Suga
    • , Yasuo Takeichi
    • , Yoshio Takahashi
    •  & Fumio Inagaki
  • Article | | open

    It remains unclear when and why the world’s oceans, once largely occupied by bacteria, became dominated by photosynthetic algae. Here, using fossil lipids in million year old rocks, the authors show that predation after the Snowball Earth glaciations created the opportunity for a global shift to algal ecosystems.

    • Lennart M. van Maldegem
    • , Pierre Sansjofre
    • , Johan W. H. Weijers
    • , Klaus Wolkenstein
    • , Paul K. Strother
    • , Lars Wörmer
    • , Jens Hefter
    • , Benjamin J. Nettersheim
    • , Yosuke Hoshino
    • , Stefan Schouten
    • , Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté
    • , Nilamoni Nath
    • , Christian Griesinger
    • , Nikolay B. Kuznetsov
    • , Marcel Elie
    • , Marcus Elvert
    • , Erik Tegelaar
    • , Gerd Gleixner
    •  & Christian Hallmann
  • Article | | open

    The underlying mechanisms structuring dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition and reactivity in rivers remain poorly quantified. Here, the authors pair mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectroscopy to show that hydrology and river geomorphology both shape molecular patterns in DOM composition.

    • Laurel M. Lynch
    • , Nicholas A. Sutfin
    • , Timothy S. Fegel
    • , Claudia M. Boot
    • , Timothy P. Covino
    •  & Matthew D. Wallenstein
  • Article | | open

    Changes in S-isotope ratios over time provide clues to understanding the co-evolution of Earth and its biosphere. Here the authors determine the isotope effect of the first reductive enzyme in the sulfate respiration pathway and reinterpret sedimentary S-isotope records based on this biochemical constraint.

    • Min Sub Sim
    • , Hideaki Ogata
    • , Wolfgang Lubitz
    • , Jess F. Adkins
    • , Alex L. Sessions
    • , Victoria J. Orphan
    •  & Shawn E. McGlynn
  • Article | | open

    The occurrence and distribution of permafrost region disturbances (PRDs) remain poorly resolved across the Arctic and Subarctic. Here, the authors quantify the abundance and distribution of three primary PRDs using a time-series analysis of 30-m resolution Landsat imagery between 1999 and 2014.

    • I. Nitze
    • , G. Grosse
    • , B. M. Jones
    • , V. E. Romanovsky
    •  & J. Boike
  • Article | | open

    Particulate optical backscattering is key to studying the oceanic carbon pump though it remains unclear what particles are detected. Here the authors show that complex particles larger than 1 µm help reproduce all the measured backscattering across the Atlantic Ocean and explain the majority of the signal.

    • Emanuele Organelli
    • , Giorgio Dall’Olmo
    • , Robert J. W. Brewin
    • , Glen A. Tarran
    • , Emmanuel Boss
    •  & Annick Bricaud
  • Article | | open

    Fires cause large perturbations to terrestrial carbon cycle through direct carbon emissions. Here the authors combine several models and measurement datasets and show that fires can indirectly worsen the carbon loss through the net negative impacts on ecosystem productivity from fire ozone and aerosols.

    • Xu Yue
    •  & Nadine Unger
  • Article | | open

    The impacts of climate change on summer carbon cycling in the northern hemisphere remain poorly resolved. Here the authors use atmospheric CO2 records from Point Barrow (Alaska) to show that summer CO2 drawdown is significantly negatively correlated with terrestrial temperature north of 50°N between 1979–2012.

    • Tao Wang
    • , Dan Liu
    • , Shilong Piao
    • , Yilong Wang
    • , Xiaoyi Wang
    • , Hui Guo
    • , Xu Lian
    • , John F Burkhart
    • , Philippe Ciais
    • , Mengtian Huang
    • , Ivan Janssens
    • , Yue Li
    • , Yongwen Liu
    • , Josep Peñuelas
    • , Shushi Peng
    • , Hui Yang
    • , Yitong Yao
    • , Yi Yin
    •  & Yutong Zhao
  • Article | | open

    Short-lived natural bromocarbons, which contribute to ozone depletion in the atmosphere, are believed to be produced through light-driven processes, mainly in oceans. Here the authors present bromocarbon measurements in snow, sea ice, and air during polar winter that show an unexpected source of bromine to the polar atmosphere during periods of no sunlight.

    • Katarina Abrahamsson
    • , Anna Granfors
    • , Martin Ahnoff
    • , Carlos A. Cuevas
    •  & Alfonso Saiz-Lopez
  • Article | | open

    Day-night cycles in the biochemical composition of phytoplankton remain poorly understood. Here, Becker et al. use lipidomic and transcriptomic data from the North Pacific subtropical gyre to describe a daily cycle of production and consumption of energy-rich lipids by eukaryotic phytoplankton.

    • Kevin W. Becker
    • , James R. Collins
    • , Bryndan P. Durham
    • , Ryan D. Groussman
    • , Angelicque E. White
    • , Helen F. Fredricks
    • , Justin E. Ossolinski
    • , Daniel J. Repeta
    • , Paul Carini
    • , E. Virginia Armbrust
    •  & Benjamin A. S. Van Mooy
  • Article | | open

    The role of thermochemical oxidation of methane (TOM) by high-valence metal oxides as a potential methane sink remains poorly understood. Here, the authors present evidence of TOM induced by Mn(Fe) oxides in a sedimentary basin, which yields calcite with extremely negative δ13C values (−70 to −22.5‰, VPDB).

    • Wen-Xuan Hu
    • , Xun Kang
    • , Jian Cao
    • , Xiao-Lin Wang
    • , Bin Fu
    •  & Hai-Guang Wu
  • Article | | open

    Thermodynamic calculations suggest that condensed carbonaceous matter should be the dominant product of abiotic organic synthesis during serpentinization of the oceanic crust at Mid-Ocean Ridges. Here the authors report natural occurrences of such carbonaceous matter formed during low temperature alteration.

    • Marie Catherine Sforna
    • , Daniele Brunelli
    • , Céline Pisapia
    • , Valerio Pasini
    • , Daniele Malferrari
    •  & Bénédicte Ménez
  • Article | | open

    The Indian Ocean provides a unique environmental gradient to test underlying drivers of the elemental composition of particulate organic matter. Here the authors show that nutrient supply, over temperature and biodiversity changes, controls regional variation of elemental ratios in the tropical Indian Ocean.

    • Catherine A. Garcia
    • , Steven E. Baer
    • , Nathan S. Garcia
    • , Sara Rauschenberg
    • , Benjamin S. Twining
    • , Michael W. Lomas
    •  & Adam C. Martiny
  • Article | | open

    Salt particles in the Amazon basin are typically attributed to marine aerosols transported from the Atlantic Ocean. Here the authors show the potential importance of fungal spores as a source of sodium-salt particles in the Amazon rainforest.

    • Swarup China
    • , Susannah M. Burrows
    • , Bingbing Wang
    • , Tristan H. Harder
    • , Johannes Weis
    • , Meryem Tanarhte
    • , Luciana V. Rizzo
    • , Joel Brito
    • , Glauber G. Cirino
    • , Po-Lun Ma
    • , John Cliff
    • , Paulo Artaxo
    • , Mary K. Gilles
    •  & Alexander Laskin
  • Article | | open

    Reduction of gaseous Hg(II) compounds drives atmospheric mercury wet and dry deposition to Earth surface ecosystems. Global Hg models assume this reduction takes place in clouds. Here the authors report a new gas-phase Hg photochemical mechanism that changes atmospheric mercury lifetime and its deposition to the surface.

    • Alfonso Saiz-Lopez
    • , Sebastian P. Sitkiewicz
    • , Daniel Roca-Sanjuán
    • , Josep M. Oliva-Enrich
    • , Juan Z. Dávalos
    • , Rafael Notario
    • , Martin Jiskra
    • , Yang Xu
    • , Feiyue Wang
    • , Colin P. Thackray
    • , Elsie M. Sunderland
    • , Daniel J. Jacob
    • , Oleg Travnikov
    • , Carlos A. Cuevas
    • , A. Ulises Acuña
    • , Daniel Rivero
    • , John M. C. Plane
    • , Douglas E. Kinnison
    •  & Jeroen E. Sonke
  • Article | | open

    Recent studies have reported preservation of proteinaceous soft tissues within dinosaur bones. Here, Wiemann et al. combine analyses of fossil vertebrate tissues and experimentally matured modern samples to elucidate the mechanism of soft tissue preservation and the environments that favor it.

    • Jasmina Wiemann
    • , Matteo Fabbri
    • , Tzu-Ruei Yang
    • , Koen Stein
    • , P. Martin Sander
    • , Mark A. Norell
    •  & Derek E. G. Briggs
  • Article | | open

    Marine sedimentary records and the proxies within play a central role in unlocking our understanding of past climates, yet interpreting the signals they contain can be complex. Here, the authors reveal and discuss the complex effects of hydrodynamics on carbon accumulation in the sediments off the Iberian margin.

    • Clayton R. Magill
    • , Blanca Ausín
    • , Pascal Wenk
    • , Cameron McIntyre
    • , Luke Skinner
    • , Alfredo Martínez-García
    • , David A. Hodell
    • , Gerald H. Haug
    • , William Kenney
    •  & Timothy I. Eglinton
  • Article | | open

    The Scotia Sea, located in the Southern Ocean, is a major hotspot for the drawdown of atmospheric CO2. Here, the authors show that the strength of the carbonate counter pump doubles when shelled pteropods dominate the plankton calcifier community, counteracting the amount of CO2 transferred to the deep ocean.

    • C. Manno
    • , F. Giglio
    • , G. Stowasser
    • , S. Fielding
    • , P. Enderlein
    •  & G. A. Tarling
  • Article | | open

    Red beds contain reduction spheroids that formed underground millions of years ago and whose origin remains poorly constrained. Here the authors use uranium isotopes to identify ancient fingerprints of bacteria in these features, confirming that they were produced by subsurface life in the geological past.

    • Sean McMahon
    • , Ashleigh v. S. Hood
    • , John Parnell
    •  & Stephen Bowden
  • Article | | open

    The GEOCARBSULF model provides the most detailed reconstructions of Phanerozoic O2, but its predictions are not supported by geochemical data. Here, a GEOCARBSULF model rebuilt from first principles, with the addition of an amended sulphur cycle and the latest isotope records, supports a Paleozoic Oxygenation Event.

    • Alexander J. Krause
    • , Benjamin J. W. Mills
    • , Shuang Zhang
    • , Noah J. Planavsky
    • , Timothy M. Lenton
    •  & Simon W. Poulton
  • Article | | open

    Soil nitrogen availability may alter carbon dynamics after permafrost thaw, but experimental evidence for this carbon-nitrogen interaction is still lacking. Here the authors show that elevated post-thaw nitrogen availability inhibits soil carbon release through its enhancement in microbial metabolic efficiency.

    • Leiyi Chen
    • , Li Liu
    • , Chao Mao
    • , Shuqi Qin
    • , Jun Wang
    • , Futing Liu
    • , Sergey Blagodatsky
    • , Guibiao Yang
    • , Qiwen Zhang
    • , Dianye Zhang
    • , Jianchun Yu
    •  & Yuanhe Yang
  • Article | | open

    Polynyas potentially played a role in sustaining marine life during the last glacial, yet their presence and importance remains equivocal. This multi-proxy study reconstructs a corridor of polynyas in the Nordic Seas during the last glacial maximum, and reveals a strong association with biological productivity.

    • Jochen Knies
    • , Denizcan Köseoğlu
    • , Leif Rise
    • , Nicole Baeten
    • , Valérie K. Bellec
    • , Reidulv Bøe
    • , Martin Klug
    • , Giuliana Panieri
    • , Patrycja E. Jernas
    •  & Simon T. Belt
  • Article | | open

    Peatlands recovering from acidification release dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but no biological role has yet been identified in this process. Here, the authors show that pH increases enhance phenol oxidase activity, pore-water DOC concentrations and lead to greater abundances in Actinobacteria and fungi.

    • Hojeong Kang
    • , Min Jung Kwon
    • , Sunghyun Kim
    • , Seunghoon Lee
    • , Timothy G. Jones
    • , Anna C. Johncock
    • , Akira Haraguchi
    •  & Chris Freeman
  • Article | | open

    Permafrost-derived carbon (C) may have been an additional source of greenhouse gases during the last glacial-interglacial transition. Here the authors show that ancient C from degrading permafrost was mobilised during phases of rapid sea-level rise, partially explaining changes in atmospheric CO2 and ∆14C.

    • Maria Winterfeld
    • , Gesine Mollenhauer
    • , Wolf Dummann
    • , Peter Köhler
    • , Lester Lembke-Jene
    • , Vera D. Meyer
    • , Jens Hefter
    • , Cameron McIntyre
    • , Lukas Wacker
    • , Ulla Kokfelt
    •  & Ralf Tiedemann
  • Article | | open

    Large peatlands exist at high latitudes because flooded conditions and cold temperatures slow decomposition, so the presence of (sub)tropical peat is enigmatic. Here the authors show that low-latitude peat is preserved due to lower carbohydrate and greater aromatic content resulting in chemical recalcitrance.

    • Suzanne B. Hodgkins
    • , Curtis J. Richardson
    • , René Dommain
    • , Hongjun Wang
    • , Paul H. Glaser
    • , Brittany Verbeke
    • , B. Rose Winkler
    • , Alexander R. Cobb
    • , Virginia I. Rich
    • , Malak Missilmani
    • , Neal Flanagan
    • , Mengchi Ho
    • , Alison M. Hoyt
    • , Charles F. Harvey
    • , S. Rose Vining
    • , Moira A. Hough
    • , Tim R. Moore
    • , Pierre J. H. Richard
    • , Florentino B. De La Cruz
    • , Joumana Toufaily
    • , Rasha Hamdan
    • , William T. Cooper
    •  & Jeffrey P. Chanton
  • Article | | open

    The sensitivity of terrestrial net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) to climate remains a major source of uncertainty. Here, the authors identify a precipitation threshold of between 750-950 mm yr−1 for the contiguous United States, beyond which NEE is regulated by respiration rather than production.

    • Zhihua Liu
    • , Ashley P. Ballantyne
    • , Benjamin Poulter
    • , William R. L. Anderegg
    • , Wei Li
    • , Ana Bastos
    •  & Philippe Ciais
  • Article | | open

    Land use intensification could modify microbial activity and thus ecosystem function. Here, Malik et al. sample microbes and carbon-related functions across a land use gradient, demonstrating that microbial biomass and carbon use efficiency are reduced in human-impacted near-neutral pH soils.

    • Ashish A. Malik
    • , Jeremy Puissant
    • , Kate M. Buckeridge
    • , Tim Goodall
    • , Nico Jehmlich
    • , Somak Chowdhury
    • , Hyun Soon Gweon
    • , Jodey M. Peyton
    • , Kelly E. Mason
    • , Maaike van Agtmaal
    • , Aimeric Blaud
    • , Ian M. Clark
    • , Jeanette Whitaker
    • , Richard F. Pywell
    • , Nick Ostle
    • , Gerd Gleixner
    •  & Robert I. Griffiths
  • Article | | open

    It remains unclear how microbes and plants contribute to soil organic carbon (SOC) accrual. Here, using biomarkers, the authors show that microbial necromass and plant-derived lignin components have divergent accumulation mechanisms and that microbial necromass plays a key role in SOC accumulation.

    • Tian Ma
    • , Shanshan Zhu
    • , Zhiheng Wang
    • , Dima Chen
    • , Guohua Dai
    • , Bowei Feng
    • , Xiangyan Su
    • , Huifeng Hu
    • , Kaihui Li
    • , Wenxuan Han
    • , Chao Liang
    • , Yongfei Bai
    •  & Xiaojuan Feng
  • Article | | open

    Permafrost thaw allows biological activity in previously frozen ground, leading to a potential release of climate-relevant gases. Here the authors show that thawing permafrost emits volatile organic compounds but that their release to the atmosphere is limited by microbial consumption in the overlaying soil.

    • Magnus Kramshøj
    • , Christian N. Albers
    • , Thomas Holst
    • , Rupert Holzinger
    • , Bo Elberling
    •  & Riikka Rinnan
  • Article | | open

    The mechanisms responsible for the burial of vast quantities of organic matter during Ocean Anoxic Event remain unclear. Here, the authors combine biogeochemical analysis and modeling and show that sulfurization could play a critical role in facilitating globally elevated burial of organic matter.

    • Morgan Reed Raven
    • , David A. Fike
    • , Maya L. Gomes
    • , Samuel M. Webb
    • , Alexander S. Bradley
    •  & Harry-Luke O. McClelland
  • Article | | open

    Permafrost carbon feedback modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to greenhouse gas emissions that accelerate climate change. Here the authors show that deeper, abrupt thaw beneath lakes will more than double radiative forcing from permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century.

    • Katey Walter Anthony
    • , Thomas Schneider von Deimling
    • , Ingmar Nitze
    • , Steve Frolking
    • , Abraham Emond
    • , Ronald Daanen
    • , Peter Anthony
    • , Prajna Lindgren
    • , Benjamin Jones
    •  & Guido Grosse
  • Article | | open

    Methane venting is a widespread phenomenon at the Cascadia margin, however a comprehensive database of methane vents at this margin is lacking. Here the authors show that the margin-wide average methane flow-rate ranges from ~4 × 106 to ~1590 × 106 kg y−1 and is on average around 88 ± 6 × 106 kg y−1.

    • M. Riedel
    • , M. Scherwath
    • , M. Römer
    • , M. Veloso
    • , M. Heesemann
    •  & G. D. Spence
  • Article | | open

    Discharge from Greenland is known to deliver nutrients to the marine environment. Here, the authors show that the majority of the nutrients fueling summertime productivity downstream of Greenland’s glaciers seemingly originate from entrainment in subglacial discharge plumes rather than from meltwater itself.

    • M. J. Hopwood
    • , D. Carroll
    • , T. J. Browning
    • , L. Meire
    • , J. Mortensen
    • , S. Krisch
    •  & E. P. Achterberg
  • Article | | open

    Our understanding of phosphorus (P) cycling in soils, a basis for many ecosystem services, has been limited by the complexity of P forms and processes. Here the authors use spectroscopic and isotopic techniques to estimate turnover times of P pools and tease apart biologically-driven and geochemically-driven P fluxes.

    • Julian Helfenstein
    • , Federica Tamburini
    • , Christian von Sperber
    • , Michael S. Massey
    • , Chiara Pistocchi
    • , Oliver A. Chadwick
    • , Peter M. Vitousek
    • , Ruben Kretzschmar
    •  & Emmanuel Frossard
  • Article | | open

    The role ice sheets play in the silica cycle over glacial−interglacial timescales remains unclear. Here, based on the measurement of silica isotopes in Greenland meltwater and a nearby marine sediment core, the authors suggest expanding ice sheets considerably increased isotopically light silica in the oceans.

    • Jon R. Hawkings
    • , Jade E. Hatton
    • , Katharine R. Hendry
    • , Gregory F. de Souza
    • , Jemma L. Wadham
    • , Ruza Ivanovic
    • , Tyler J. Kohler
    • , Marek Stibal
    • , Alexander Beaton
    • , Guillaume Lamarche-Gagnon
    • , Andrew Tedstone
    • , Mathis P. Hain
    • , Elizabeth Bagshaw
    • , Jennifer Pike
    •  & Martyn Tranter
  • Article | | open

    Forests of the Amazon Basin have experienced frequent and severe droughts in recent years with significant impacts on their carbon cycling. Here, using satellite LiDAR samples from 2003 to 2008, the authors show the long-term legacy of these droughts with persistent loss of carbon stocks after the 2005 drought.

    • Yan Yang
    • , Sassan S. Saatchi
    • , Liang Xu
    • , Yifan Yu
    • , Sungho Choi
    • , Nathan Phillips
    • , Robert Kennedy
    • , Michael Keller
    • , Yuri Knyazikhin
    •  & Ranga B. Myneni
  • Article | | open

    The magnitudes of replenishment and priming, two important but opposing fluxes in soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics, have not been compared. Here the authors show that the magnitude of replenishment is greater than that of priming, resulting in a net SOC accumulation after additional carbon input to soils.

    • Junyi Liang
    • , Zhenghu Zhou
    • , Changfu Huo
    • , Zheng Shi
    • , James R. Cole
    • , Lei Huang
    • , Konstantinos T. Konstantinidis
    • , Xiaoming Li
    • , Bo Liu
    • , Zhongkui Luo
    • , C. Ryan Penton
    • , Edward A. G. Schuur
    • , James M. Tiedje
    • , Ying-Ping Wang
    • , Liyou Wu
    • , Jianyang Xia
    • , Jizhong Zhou
    •  & Yiqi Luo
  • Article | | open

    Studying the PETM, a past period of rapid warming ~56 Ma, could provide insights into ecosystem response under future warming conditions. Here, the authors present stable nitrogen isotope data that reveal a dramatic change in the marine nitrogen cycle and the emergence of anoxic conditions.

    • Christopher K. Junium
    • , Alexander J. Dickson
    •  & Benjamin T. Uveges
  • Article | | open

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquatic systems is among the most complex molecular mixtures known. Here the authors show that a major component in DOM is molecularly indistinguishable in marine and freshwater environments, which could reflect universal mechanisms behind long-term DOM turnover.

    • Maren Zark
    •  & Thorsten Dittmar
  • Article | | open

    Land-based mitigation for meeting the Paris climate target must consider the carbon cycle impacts of land-use change. Here the authors show that when bioenergy crops replace high carbon content ecosystems, forest-based mitigation could be more effective for CO2 removal than bioenergy crops with carbon capture and storage.

    • Anna B. Harper
    • , Tom Powell
    • , Peter M. Cox
    • , Joanna House
    • , Chris Huntingford
    • , Timothy M. Lenton
    • , Stephen Sitch
    • , Eleanor Burke
    • , Sarah E. Chadburn
    • , William J. Collins
    • , Edward Comyn-Platt
    • , Vassilis Daioglou
    • , Jonathan C. Doelman
    • , Garry Hayman
    • , Eddy Robertson
    • , Detlef van Vuuren
    • , Andy Wiltshire
    • , Christopher P. Webber
    • , Ana Bastos
    • , Lena Boysen
    • , Philippe Ciais
    • , Narayanappa Devaraju
    • , Atul K. Jain
    • , Andreas Krause
    • , Ben Poulter
    •  & Shijie Shu
  • Article | | open

    Mackinawite is commonly assumed to be the first solid phase in the iron sulfide system. Here, the authors report the existence of a highly reactive nanocrystalline solid phase that is a necessary precursor to the formation of mackinawite.

    • Adriana Matamoros-Veloza
    • , Oscar Cespedes
    • , Benjamin R. G. Johnson
    • , Tomasz M. Stawski
    • , Umberto Terranova
    • , Nora H. de Leeuw
    •  & Liane G. Benning
  • Article | | open

    The means by which planktonic cyanobacteria were able to persist through the Archean despite high fluxes of UV radiation are unclear. Here, the authors show that Fe(III)-Si rich precipitates in the Archean photic zone could have provided early planktonic cyanobacteria an effective shield against UV-C radiation.

    • Aleksandra M. Mloszewska
    • , Devon B. Cole
    • , Noah J. Planavsky
    • , Andreas Kappler
    • , Denise S. Whitford
    • , George W. Owttrim
    •  & Kurt. O Konhauser
  • Article | | open

    Chain-forming diatoms are key organisms in the biotic transfer of CO2 from the atmosphere to the ocean interior. Here, the authors show that turbulence stimulates and links small-scale and large scale processes from CO2 assimilation at a diatom cell level to nitrogen cycling in fast-sinking diatom aggregates.

    • Johanna Bergkvist
    • , Isabell Klawonn
    • , Martin J. Whitehouse
    • , Gaute Lavik
    • , Volker Brüchert
    •  & Helle Ploug