Collections

  • Collection |

    A collection of data descriptors from studies supported by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme.

    Image: Alex Wunsch
  • Collection |

    A collection of articles exploring the impact that data resources have on their research communities.

  • Collection |

    A collection of research and data papers published across Nature Research, from the fifth cycle of the Functional ANnoTation Of the Mammalian genome project (FANTOM).

    Image: Richard Janissen - TU Delft
  • Collection |

    The robustness of a scientific finding must be judged not just by the merits of the original experiments, but also by the ability of these findings to be independently reproduced. Concerns that published findings, however, are commonly failing to reproduce have shaken trust in science, and led to calls for reforms in how scientific findings are evaluated and transmitted. As part of this movement, groups have called for replication studies – studies that repeat experiments in previous work to test the reproducibility of previous findings – to be better rewarded and more widely shared. This collection presents datasets collected from a series of replication studies, each presented in a transparent manner that would allow others to analyse the data themselves or compare it with past works. Several of the studies host their data in the Open Science Framework, a service of the Center for Open Science, which has been a strong advocate for wider research replication.

  • Collection |

    Understanding a gene’s functions is no less important than knowing its sequence, but data derived from functional screens have often been shared less systematically and thoroughly than sequencing data. This collection of data descriptors, organized in partnership with groups from leading functional genomics screening facilities around the globe, demonstrates the feasibility and value of sharing these inherently complex data types.

  • Collection |

    High-quality data on human population distributions are required for a wide range of applications, from assessing the impacts of population growth to planning elections. This collection brings together a series of publications at Scientific Data describing datasets from WorldPop, an initiative that aims to provide detailed, open-access spatial demographic datasets using transparent approaches – focusing, in particular, on low and middle-income countries where high-quality data has historically been lacking.

  • Collection |

    X-ray lasers scheduled to come online in the next few years promise to create a flood of new structural biology data that could overwhelm current processing and analysis methods. This collection describes a series of X-ray free-electron laser datasets generated at the Linac Coherent Light Source, which the organizers hope will help researchers develop new tools and methods to meet these challenges. All data are deposited at the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) and openly available to the scientific community.

  • Focus |

    The largest-ever set of human genomes from a single population and the consequent insights into mutation, evolution, gene function and disease predisposition are reported in four linked papers. These results provide a strategy for the analysis of the full spectrum of genetic variation in any population and raise questions about how society should implement the knowledge gained. Produced with support from Illumina.

  • Collection |

    This collection presents a series of articles describing human brain scans – produced with a variety of magnetic resonation imaging (MRI) methods and modalities – which are designed to help researchers assess the reproducibility of brain imaging techniques and to develop new methods based on these data-types. Central to this collection are studies from the Consortium on Reliability and Reproducibility (CoRR), a major initiative that has organized the release of data from thousands of individual brain scans collected at 18 international sites.

  • Collection |

    This Web Collection presents the results of the RNA Sequencing Quality Control (SEQC) project that sought to evaluate the reproducibility and comparability of high-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq). Data from several different laboratories are compared and the performance of different sequencing platforms and data analysis approaches are assessed, together with benchmarking against DNA microarrays. Ultimately, these multi-platform, cross-site studies will enable RNA-seq to be applied more broadly in analyzing large cohorts for discovery research and clinical use. This is the latest phase of a collaboration between government, academic and industry researchers as part of the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium.We are grateful for the support of our sponsors, the FDA's National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR/FDA) and the State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering (SKLGE) at Fudan University. As always, Nature Research carries sole responsibility for all editorial content.

  • Collection |

    The NESCent Collection brings together Data Descriptors arising from research supported by the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent).