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Volume 13 Issue 3, March 2006

The C2A and C2B domains of synaptotagmin are believed to act as Ca 2+ -sensing triggers in synaptic vesicle fusion. Data from Araç et al. indicate that the C2B domain can bind simultaneously to two separate membranes, suggesting that synaptotagmin can bring the synaptic vesicle and plasma membranes into close proximity as a prelude to vesicle fusion events. Cover art by E. Boyle is based on an EM image provided by J. Rizo and inspired by W. Kandinsky. pp 209-217

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