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Volume 13 Issue 10, October 2017

Cover image supplied by David Fernandes-Cabral, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. The corticospinal tract of the human brain on high-definition fibre tracking. The corticospinal tract, the longest white matter tract in the CNS, originates from the primary motor cortex, and crosses the internal capsule, brainstem and, finally, the spinal cord. Lesions such as brain tumours, arteriovenous malformations and strokes can displace, disrupt or infiltrate this tract. Advanced fibre tracking methods allow precise reconstruction of the tract, which can help improve outcomes after neurosurgical procedures.

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  • The Lancet Commission on Dementia Prevention, Intervention, and Care has evaluated current evidence on dementia management, including the measures that can be taken to reduce an individual's risk of dementia. However, further intervention trials and evaluation in real-world settings are needed to alter dementia incidence globally.

    • Louise Lafortune
    • Carol Brayne
    News & Views
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Review Article

  • Tuberculous menigitis (TBM) presents a major health burden around the world, especially in individuals with concomitant HIV infection, in whom mortality is nearly 50%. Here, members of the TBM International Research Consortium summarize our current understanding of TBM pathogenesis, diagnosis and management, and discuss key avenues for future research.

    • Robert J. Wilkinson
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    • Guy E. Thwaites
    Review Article
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    • Yusuf A. Rajabally
    • Mark Stettner
    • Rayaz A. Malik
    Review Article
  • Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer disease (AD) is not simply a CNS disorder, but involves interactions between systemic and brain-related factors. Wang and colleagues review the role of amyloid-β (Aβ) in AD, highlighting systemic abnormalities linked to Aβ metabolism and discussing how these abnormalities might influence central pathways of Aβ production and clearance.

    • Jun Wang
    • Ben J. Gu
    • Yan-Jiang Wang
    Review Article
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Consensus Statement

  • Chronic pain is the greatest source of disability globally and claims related to chronic pain feature in many insurance and medico-legal cases. In this Consensus Statement, a presidential task force of the International Association for the Study of Pain examines the capabilities of brain imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pain, and the ethical and legal implications of such uses of brain imaging.

    • Karen D. Davis
    • Herta Flor
    • Tor D. Wager
    Consensus Statement Open Access
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