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Volume 19 Issue 5, May 2018

'Riding the wave' by Jennie Vallis, inspired by the Review on p255.

Volume 19 Issue 5

Research Highlight

  • A combination of electrochemical neuromodulation of spinal leg circuits and physical training in a robotic rehabilitation system restored volitional locomotion in rodents with severe spinal cord injury.

    • Sian Lewis
    Research Highlight

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  • A study of post-mortem brains from individuals of difference ages suggests that hippocampal neurogenesis in humans decreases during childhood and is absent in adults.

    • Natasha Bray
    Research Highlight
  • In the spinal cord and thalamus of mice, astrocyte-generated interleukin-33 instructs microglia to engulf synapses and thus regulates neural circuit development.

    • Darran Yates
    Research Highlight
  • This study shows that human neural stem cell grafts re-establish a neuronal relay across spinal cord injury in rhesus monkeys.

    • Katharine H. Wrighton
    Research Highlight
  • Two studies provide insight into the neural circuits integrating competing threat signals, such as pain and hunger.

    • Katherine Whalley
    Research Highlight
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In Brief

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Review Article

  • Advanced recording techniques have enabled the identification of travelling waves of neuronal activity in different areas of the cortex. Sejnowski and colleagues review these findings, consider the mechanisms by which travelling waves are generated and evaluate their possible roles in cortical function.

    • Lyle Muller
    • Frédéric Chavane
    • Terrence J. Sejnowski
    Review Article
  • Fibrinogen enters the brain in a wide range of brain diseases that involve blood–brain barrier disruption. In this Review, Petersen et al. discuss recent evidence that fibrinogen causes damage that contributes to the pathology of a range of neurological disorders and discuss therapeutic implications.

    • Mark A. Petersen
    • Jae Kyu Ryu
    • Katerina Akassoglou
    Review Article
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Opinion

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