Collections

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    This collection includes recent articles from across the Nature group of journals and showcases both the latest advances in the methodologies used to study genome organization, and our recent understanding of how genome organization and nuclear architecture regulate gene expression, cell fate and cell function in physiology and disease.

    Image: V. Summersby
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    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that eventually results in dementia. Currently, there are no disease-modifying therapies for AD and the few available symptomatic treatments are of limited benefit. Thus, there is a pressing need to better understand this disease in order to develop effective treatments and to detect the disease in individuals before they exhibit extensive brain atrophy. This article series examines our current understanding of the pathophysiology of AD and some of the approaches being used to study this disease.

    Image: Jennie Vallis
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    The Kavli Prize is awarded by a partnership between the Norwegian Academy of Sciences, the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research and the Kavli Foundation recognizing seminal work of scientists in astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience

    Image: The Kavli Foundation / Enzo Finger Design
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    Popularization of super-resolution imaging techniques has allowed cell biologists to probe cell structure and function in previously unattainable detail. These methodologies continue to evolve, with new improvements that allow tailoring the available techniques to a particular need and application. This collection showcases primary research articles, reviews and protocols and highlights these recent developments by exemplifying the new, interesting applications of super-resolution microscopy as well as related tool development.

    Image: Bertocchi et al., Nature Cell Biology volume 19, pages 28–37 (2017).
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    Image: Illustration by Eric Nyquist
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    Obesity and metabolic disorders are becoming increasingly prevalent in many parts of the world, and have been accompanied by rising morbidity and associated health costs. This crisis has driven increased research efforts aimed at understanding the neurophysiological systems that regulate food intake and metabolism — and how these systems can become dysfunctional. Nature Reviews Neuroscience presents a series of articles examining various aspects of this regulation in health and disease, including the potential implications for the development of therapies.

    Image: Jennie Vallis
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    2017 marks the 200th anniversary since James Parkinson published his Essay on the Shaking Palsy. To mark this event, Nature Reviews bring together a collection of cutting edge articles that summarize the current basic and clinical research in Parkinson disease.

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    Recent years have witnessed the launch of several large-scale national and international initiatives that aim to transform our understanding of brain structure and function through collaborative research and the development and implementation of state-of-the-art neurotechnology. These projects are likely to have wide-ranging influences on all aspects of neuroscientific research, from its organization to its funding. Nature Reviews Neuroscience presents a series of Comment articles in which leading neuroscientists provide their thoughts on the issues, challenges and opportunities that these initiatives present.

    Image: MACMILLAN MEXICO
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    Acute stress induces signalling in the brain and physiological changes that allow an individual to respond appropriately to the encountered situation or threat, whereas chronic stress can elicit detrimental, long-lasting effects on brain function. Nature Reviews Neurosciencepresents a series of articles on stress that cover topics ranging from the molecular pathways and cellular processes that are affected by stress to its effects at the behavioural level.

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    Although cannabis has been used for centuries as a recreational drug, the mechanisms of action of its active constituents (cannabinoids) and their endogenous counterparts (endocannabinoids) have only been discovered relatively recently. Nature Reviews Neurosciencepresents a series of articles that examine the multiplicity of roles of the endocannabinoid system in the CNS, from development to behaviour, and the potential for cannabinoid-based therapies in the treatment of a range of brain disorders.

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    New insights into the neural processes that underlie cognition and behaviour have led to discussions about the relevance of these discoveries for the criminal justice system. Conversely, laws can influence neuroscience, for example, with regard to psychoactive drugs and stem cell research. Nature Reviews Neurosciencepresents a series of articles that explore the interaction between neuroscience and the law.