A schematic of genetic pain loss disorders

Genetic pain loss disorders

Genetic pain loss includes congenital insensitivity to pain, hereditary sensory neuropathies and, if autonomic nerves are involved, hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy. 

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A group of women with diverse backgrounds and physiques are standing together, supporting each other and looking ahead.

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