Collections

  • Collection |

    This collection from the cancer editorial community at Nature Research journals focuses on highlighting work on rare cancers, from preclinical basic research to translational and clinical research.

    Image: Simon Bradbrook/Springer Nature Limited
  • Collection |

    The Key Advances in Medicine 2019 collection, a collaborative effort from the eight clinical Nature Reviews journals, offers expert insight into the most important discoveries made in 2018, and is an essential resource for students, physicians and clinical researchers.

  • Collection |

    The Key Advances in Clinical Oncology collection offers expert insight into the most important discoveries made each year, and is an essential resource for students, physicians and clinical researchers.

  • Collection |

    In this Collection, Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology and Nature Reviews Cancer together present a selection of our most recent articles covering the biology and treatment of haematological cancers highlighting the remarkable advances that have been made in both basic and translational research.

    Image: Simon Bradbrook/Springer Nature Limited
  • Collection |

    Much like our oceans, the world of clinical and biomedical research is vast, fast-paced, dynamic and full of unanswered questions. In 2017, numerous advances were made that could change the tide of efforts to fight disease. The Key Advances in Medicine eBook distils the major discoveries made in 2017 and highlights trends to look out for in 2018.

  • Collection |

    In this collection, the cancer editorial community of the Nature journals presents the most recently published articles on cancer evolution. The topic is discussed from different angles (preclinical, translational and clinical), and across a range of tumour types.

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    The past 10 years has seen great advances in the understanding and treatment of human disease. For expert perspectives on the most important breakthroughs, don't miss the FREE A Decade in Medicine eBook. In this special collection of 47 articles, leading experts highlight the most important advances in eight medical specialties between 2004 and 2015, and comment on future developments in their fields.

  • Focus |

    In the West, childhood cancers are associated with a very high level of treatment success (approaching 90%), with many childhood survivors reaching adulthood. Perhaps because of this success, progress in the field of paediatric oncology has lagged behind that of adult malignancies. Drug development is slow, and rarely examined in the paediatric population first-hand. Treating the child with cancer brings into play a number of issues not typically experienced with adult patients that can have a range of long-term effects: from dosing infants to performing surgery near growing structures. Paediatric oncology is a bustling field with a wide remit, from genomic studies to surgical innovations. This focus issue aims to look at a number of the key issues, and the cutting-edge research, surrounding treating arguably our most vulnerable patients. Free full access until 1 May 2015

  • Focus |

    November 2014 marks the 10th anniversary of the launch of Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, originally published under the title ofNature Clinical Practice Oncology. To celebrate this milestone, we have commissioned a collection of Decade in Review articles from key opinion leaders to summarize the major advances in six sub-specialties of oncology over the past 10 years. We also present a comprehensive Perspectives article that summarizes the key advances and challenges in translational oncology. In addition, we have commissioned a Viewpoint article in which we asked four of our Advisory Board members from around the globe to discuss topics such as clinical development and testing of multiple agents in combination, regulatory challenges relating to drug development and trial design, and funding for basic research. Together, these articles provide an authoritative snapshot of the oncology field in 2014, and how this might progress over the forthcoming decade. These articles, together with a special infographic,provides a snapshot of 10 years of the journal in numbers.

  • Focus |

    Prostate cancer is heterogeneous disease and the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous malignancy in men. Advanced-stage prostate cancer is often treated with androgen-deprivation therapy, which is associated with decreased bone mineral density and an increased risk of osteoporotic fragility fractures. In the past 5 year many new targeted agents in the metastatic setting have been approved, and the remit of bone-targeted agents for the management of advanced-stage prostate cancer has gathered momentum. This collection will critically discuss the role of surgery, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy in men with high-risk disease based on the available trial data. In patients with low-risk disease, the role of active surveillance and focal therapy is covered together with the challenges of over diagnosis and under diagnosis in men with small-Vol. unpredictable disease. Other topics include multiparametric MRI for detection, staging and treatment planning, as well as the challenges of managing elderly men with prostate cancer.

  • Collection |

    A web focus from Cell Death & Differentiation, Cell Death & Disease, Nature Reviews Cancer, Nature Cell Biology, Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology and Nature Structural & Molecular Biology. We hope you enjoy this focus including work from the world's most recognized experts in the field of autophagy.

  • Collection |

    Nature Reviews Clinical OncologyandNature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatologytogether present a selection of articles covering key aspects of the pathogenesis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, including insights into disease pathways and possible future therapeutic targets. This timely Web Collection provides an invaluable educational resource for scientists, clinicians and medical students with an interest in improving outcomes of patients with this deadly disease.