BrainPod Podcast from Neuropsychopharmacology

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Current Episodes

Listen to the current show May 24, 2018: Debating the Persistence of Neurogenesis in Humans | Listen

The question of whether neurogenesis persists in humans and for how long — that is, whether and where humans grow new neurons in their brains, and how long into our lives — is one that has engaged neuroscientists for decades. Some papers showed that humans did retain neurogenesis into adulthood, but the issue has been debated. That debate was reignited just recently with the publication of two new studies. The first one, published in Nature, is titled "Human hippocampal neurogenesis drops sharply in children to undetectable levels in adults." Not long after, a second paper was published in Cell Stem Cell, titled, "Human hipoocampal neurogenesis persists throughout aging." To discuss the seemingly contradictory results of these two papers on Neuropsychopharmacology's BrainPod are Dr. Lisa Monteggia, professor of neuroscience at UT Southwestern Medical Center, and Dr. Christoph Anacker, assistant professor in clinical neurobiology at Columbia University.

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Subscription to the Neuropsychopharmacology Podcast is FREE! Click here for the feed. See the help and FAQ section if you have trouble subscribing or need more information.

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Archive

See the archive page for previous shows, which features links to the Neuropsychopharmacology articles mentioned in each show.

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Help and FAQ

The Neuropsychopharmacology Podcast is an audio file you can play on any computer - you don't need an iPod. See our help and FAQ section for instructions on listening and subscribing to the BrainPod Podcast and for more information about podcasts.

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Disclaimer

Whilst every effort is made by the publishers and editorial board to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinion or statement appears in this Journal, they wish to make it clear that the data and opinions appearing in podcasts herein are the responsibility of the contributor or advertiser concerned. Accordingly, American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the publishers, the editorial committee, and their respective employees, officers and agents accept no liability whatsoever for the consequences of any such inaccurate or misleading data, opinion or statement. Whilst every effort is made to ensure that drug doses and other quantities are presented accurately, listeners are advised that new methods and techniques involving drug usage that are described within these podcasts should only be followed in conjunction with the drug manufacturer's own published literature.

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