Volume 4 Issue 7, July 2008

Volume 4 Issue 7

Progress in the emerging field of attosecond science continues apace. The emission of attosecond pulses by the interaction of a high-intensity laser with an atomic gas is well known. But for greater versatility and control it could be preferable to use molecules. To this end, Willem Boutu and colleagues exploit quantum interference effects between intramolecular electronic states of aligned carbon dioxide molecules to coherently control the emission of attosecond pulses of extreme-ultraviolet light. Letter p545

Cover design by David Shand

Editorial

  • Editorial |

    A wealth of information is available online, in useful encyclopaedic form. But how much of it is to be trusted?

Thesis

Books and Arts

Research Highlights

News and Views

  • News & Views |

    Optomechanical set-ups use radiation pressure to manipulate macroscopic mechanical objects. Two experiments transfer this concept to the fields of superconducting microwave circuits and cold-atom physics.

    • Florian Marquardt
  • News & Views |

    The motion of electrons inside, around and between atoms can be captured with attosecond time resolution. A technique has now been demonstrated that can reveal electron dynamics even without attosecond light flashes.

    • Matthias Kling
    •  & Ferenc Krausz
  • News & Views |

    The ability to electrically control spin dynamics in quantum dots makes them one of the most promising platforms for solid-state quantum-information processing. Minimizing the influence of the nuclear spin environment is an important step towards realizing such promise.

    • Michael D. Schroer
    •  & Jason R. Petta

Progress Article

  • Progress Article |

    Fluorophores are quantum objects that blink intermittently and whose dark states exist practically ‘forever’—on quantum-mechanical scales, that is. Although there is no accepted theory, there has been plenty of theoretical progress.

    • Pavel Frantsuzov
    • , Masaru Kuno
    • , Boldizsár Jankó
    •  & Rudolph A. Marcus

Letters

  • Letter |

    Defects in Josephson junctions are considered a nuisance when it comes to using superconducting circuits as building blocks for a quantum-information processor. But if the interaction between the circuit and defects is accurately controlled—as has been demonstrated now—the imperfections might be useful, serving as memory elements.

    • Matthew Neeley
    • , M. Ansmann
    • , Radoslaw C. Bialczak
    • , M. Hofheinz
    • , N. Katz
    • , Erik Lucero
    • , A. O’Connell
    • , H. Wang
    • , A. N. Cleland
    •  & John M. Martinis
  • Letter |

    In copper-oxide superconductors, charge carriers must be added to the insulating ‘parent’ compound before superconductivity appears. Exactly how the dopants affect the crystalline surface and evolving Fermi surface is now clear.

    • M. A. Hossain
    • , J. D. F. Mottershead
    • , D. Fournier
    • , A. Bostwick
    • , J. L. McChesney
    • , E. Rotenberg
    • , R. Liang
    • , W. N. Hardy
    • , G. A. Sawatzky
    • , I. S. Elfimov
    • , D. A. Bonn
    •  & A. Damascelli
  • Letter |

    Infrared spectra of graphene deposited on a silicon oxide substrate suggest that many-body effects have a more significant role in determining its electronic behaviour than in free-standing graphene

    • Z. Q. Li
    • , E. A. Henriksen
    • , Z. Jiang
    • , Z. Hao
    • , M. C. Martin
    • , P. Kim
    • , H. L. Stormer
    •  & D. N. Basov
  • Letter |

    Carbon nanotube double quantum dots, whose shell-like electronic structure is reminiscent of that of a simple molecule, provide a useful system to study the interaction of just a few electrons at a time.

    • H. Ingerslev Jørgensen
    • , K. Grove-Rasmussen
    • , K.-Y. Wang
    • , A. M. Blackburn
    • , K. Flensberg
    • , P. E. Lindelof
    •  & D. A. Williams
  • Letter |

    The observation of spin blockade and lifetime-enhanced transport effects in Si/SiGe double quantum dots represents a promising step in the development of silicon-based quantum devices.

    • Nakul Shaji
    • , C. B. Simmons
    • , Madhu Thalakulam
    • , Levente J. Klein
    • , Hua Qin
    • , H. Luo
    • , D. E. Savage
    • , M. G. Lagally
    • , A. J. Rimberg
    • , R. Joynt
    • , M. Friesen
    • , R. H. Blick
    • , S. N. Coppersmith
    •  & M. A. Eriksson
  • Letter |

    Accurate measurement of the phase of the high harmonics emitted from aligned CO2 molecules in a strong laser field represent an important step in the generation of shaped attosecond pulses and the coherent control of matter.

    • W. Boutu
    • , S. Haessler
    • , H. Merdji
    • , P. Breger
    • , G. Waters
    • , M. Stankiewicz
    • , L. J. Frasinski
    • , R. Taieb
    • , J. Caillat
    • , A. Maquet
    • , P. Monchicourt
    • , B. Carre
    •  & P. Salieres

Articles

  • Article |

    Nanoscale beams are one platform for exploring quantum-mechanical phenomena in ever-larger systems. The collective motion of a macroscopic ensemble of ultracold atoms confined in an optical cavity is established as an alternative approach.

    • Kater W. Murch
    • , Kevin L. Moore
    • , Subhadeep Gupta
    •  & Dan M. Stamper-Kurn
  • Article |

    A technique that uses the rotating electric-field vector of a circularly polarized laser pulse as a ‘clock’ provides a fresh approach to measuring electron dynamics with attosecond time resolution.

    • Petrissa Eckle
    • , Mathias Smolarski
    • , Philip Schlup
    • , Jens Biegert
    • , André Staudte
    • , Markus Schöffler
    • , Harm G. Muller
    • , Reinhard Dörner
    •  & Ursula Keller
  • Article |

    Superfluid 3He is a quantum condensate in which the He atoms are paired in an unconventional way. Yet despite extensive research on the collective modes of superfluid 3He, one mode has remained undiscovered, until now.

    • J. P. Davis
    • , J. Pollanen
    • , H. Choi
    • , J. A. Sauls
    •  & W. P. Halperin

Futures

  • Futures |

    Conflicting messages.

    • Kenneth Schneyer