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Volume 11 Issue 11, November 2017

Quantum optics with X-rays

Artistic impression of the interaction between X-ray photons and nuclear transitions in 57Fe atoms that are located inside coupled cavities. The approach allows quantum effects such as Rabi oscillations to be observed with X-rays rather than with visible or infrared light.

See Haber et al. 11, 720–725 (2017)

Image: DESY/Ralf Röhlsberger, Boris Kumicak. Cover Design: Bethany Vukomanovic.

Volume 11 Issue 11

Editorial

  • The Nobel Prize-winning observation of gravitational waves has required laser interferometry to be pushed to extreme limits of sensitivity.

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Comment

  • The creation of a global quantum network is now a realistic proposition thanks to developments in satellite and fibre links and quantum memory. Applications will range from secure communication and fundamental physics experiments to a future quantum internet.

    • Christoph Simon
    Comment
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Books and Arts

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Q&As

  • Giorgio Anania, the vice president of Photonics21 and CEO of Aledia, a French developer of GaN microwire LEDs, discusses the impact of the Photonics Public Private Partnership on jobs and growth in Europe and the importance of investing in future industries.

    • Rachel Won
    Q&A
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Research Highlights

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News and Views

  • The demonstration of strong coupling between two nuclear polariton modes in the X-ray spectral region using two coupled cavities each containing a thin layer of iron brings new opportunities for exploring quantum science.

    • Elena Kuznetsova
    • Olga Kocharovskaya
    News & Views
  • Diffraction-free light-sheet beams, strongly confined in one axis, are typically thought to self-bend during propagation in free space and cannot be made flat. Now, diffraction-free planar light sheets in air have been realized by exploiting polychromatic pulsed beams.

    • Juan José Sáenz
    News & Views
  • Optical trapping of ions is relatively new and has been limited to a few milliseconds so far. Now researchers have trapped a single barium ion for several seconds, putting experiments with ultracold atoms and ions within reach.

    • Dietrich Leibfried
    News & Views
  • At the 24th General Congress of the International Commission for Optics in Tokyo, photonics-based sensing and simulations were shown to benefit research into phenomena that span the nanometre to astronomical range.

    • Noriaki Horiuchi
    News & Views
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