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Volume 6 Issue 7, July 2011

Metamaterials are artificial materials with optical properties that are not found in naturally occurring materials, such as negative indices of refraction, and they are made by introducing nanoscale structure into conventional materials. John Rogers and co-workers now report that large areas of flexible high-quality negative-index metamaterials can be produced by 'printing' a multilayer stack consisting of alternate layers of silver and magnesium fluoride onto a substrate. The metamaterial shown in this colourized scanning electron micrograph is 430 nm thick; the image is 4.8 âμm wide.

Image credit: A. Jerez, Beckman Institute.

Letter p402; News & Views p396

Thesis

  • The prefix nano, which is based on the Greek word for dwarf, became part of scientific nomenclature in 1960. Chris Toumey explores the role of language and languages in science.

    • Chris Toumey
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Research Highlights

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News & Views

  • Transfer printing of negative-index metamaterials with areas of tens of square centimetres onto flexible substrates paves the way for practical, low-cost, large-area exotic optics.

    • Richard D. Averitt
    News & Views
  • Attaching certain protein fragments that are found in the nuclear pore complex onto a solid-state nanopore mimics important aspects of the selective transport of molecules and proteins that occurs in real cells.

    • Tijana Jovanovic-Talisman
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  • The ultrasoft 'tip' of the cold-atom scanning probe microscope will offer new possibilities for exploring the interactions between atoms and surfaces.

    • Christian L. Degen
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  • Electrostatic doping of the transparent insulator potassium tantalate with an electric double-layer transistor has allowed superconductivity to be observed in this material for the first time.

    • Kosmas Prassides
    News & Views
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Letter

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