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Volume 6 Issue 12, December 2011

The behaviour of water in nanopores is very different from that of bulk water. For example, water can spontaneously evaporate if it is confined in a sufficiently narrow hydrophobic nanopore. Now Zuzanna Siwy and co-workers have shown that a single hydrophobic nanopore in a PET membrane can undergo reversible wetting and dewetting under the influence of an applied electric field, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. The nanopores are made hydrophobic by treating them with (trimethylsilyl)diazomethane. The cover is a photograph of a water droplet (which measures approximately 2 mm across) on a PET surface that has been treated in this way to make it hydrophobic.

Article p798; News & Views p759

COVER DESIGN: ALEX WING

Correspondence

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Research Highlights

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News & Views

  • The observation that charges flowing through one quantum wire can drag charges in a second, unconnected wire either forwards or backwards requires a re-interpretation of Coulomb drag.

    • Markus Büttiker
    • Rafael Sánchez
    News & Views
  • Signals that damage cells grown underneath a cellular barrier are transmitted only when the barrier is more than one layer thick.

    • Berthold Huppertz
    News & Views
  • Artificial nanopores with hydrophobic surface patches can be reversibly filled with water by applying electric fields.

    • Ulrich Rant
    News & Views
  • Lipid monolayers and bilayers can stabilize networks of water droplets inside larger drops of oil to create structures that could have a range of applications.

    • David Needham
    News & Views
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Review Article

  • DNA molecules have been used to build a variety of novel nanoscale structures and devices over the past 30 years. This article reviews the challenges facing the field of structural DNA nanotechnology and outlines promising potential applications in areas such as molecular and cellular biophysics, energy transfer and photonics, and diagnostics and therapeutics for human health.

    • Andre V. Pinheiro
    • Dongran Han
    • Hao Yan
    Review Article
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Letter

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Article

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