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Volume 4 Issue 10, October 2009

π-conjugated molecules can self-assemble into quasi-one-dimensional nanostructures with intriguing optoelectronic properties. However, many potential applications require these nanostructures to be immobilized on a solid substrate, which is difficult to do without damaging them. David Vanden Bout and co-workers have now immobilized double-walled molecular nanotubes made from cyanine dyes, demonstrating that they remain morphologically intact and also display highly uniform optical properties. The thin yellow lines in this image from a scanning force microscope are single cyanine-dye nanotubes and the thicker lines are bundles of such nanotubes; the image is 10 μm across.

Cover design by Karen Moore

Letter p658; Editorial p607

Editorial

  • Researchers are slowly but surely improving the processing of organic semiconductors, making organic devices more viable.

    Editorial

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Commentary

  • Calls for more data on the impact of nanomaterials on human health and the environment reflect a failure to accept that there will always be unknowns associated with any new technology. Effective governance of emerging nanotechnologies will require an acknowledgement of these unknowns, an open and adaptive approach to regulation, and the courage to make decisions.

    • Simon Brown
    Commentary
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Feature

  • Small start-up companies are making large volumes of graphene, the world's thinnest material, for applications such as composites and electrodes.

    • Michael Segal
    Feature
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Thesis

  • A report on nanotechnology published in 2004 by two learned societies in the UK has had impacts in other areas of science and technology, as Richard Jones reports.

    • Richard Jones
    Thesis
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Research Highlights

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News & Views

  • Researchers have seen strong coupling between the mechanical motion of a carbon nanotube and the passage of single electrons through the nanotube.

    • Marc Bockrath
    News & Views
  • A sensor consisting of an array of gold nanoparticles can distinguish the breath of lung cancer patients from the breath of healthy individuals without the need to pre-treat or dehumidify the samples.

    • Peter Mazzone
    News & Views
  • Thermochemical lithography is able to produce features just 28 nanometres wide on polymer surfaces.

    • Amar S. Basu
    • Yogesh B. Gianchandani
    News & Views
  • The magnetism of semiconductor nanocrystals can be controlled by shining light on them, which could have applications in information storage and processing.

    • Igor Žutić
    • Andre Petukhov
    News & Views
  • DNA reactions can be used to implement simple logic programs.

    • Darko Stefanovic
    News & Views
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Correction

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Progress Article

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Review Article

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Letter

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Article

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Focus

  • Organic semiconductors are easy to process and can be used to make devices that are transparent, flexible and cheap. However, they are also fragile and not particularly good at conducting electricity. Three papers in the October 2009 issue of Nature Nanotechnologyshow that careful processing can redress these drawbacks, without compromising those qualities that make organics attractive in the first place.

    Focus
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