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Volume 10 Issue 11, November 2015

Unlike DNA, the use of proteins as building blocks for engineering biological devices has remained largely unexplored. Philip Dannhauser and colleagues have now formed regular two-dimensional lattices of clathrin, a three-legged protein complex, on a variety of solid supports. The lattices can be dehydrated and rehydrated without the loss of function, and can be stored for months, offering potential applications in biosensing. The cover shows an electron micrograph of an irregular aluminium surface coated with regular clathrin lattices (magnification: 165,000×). The surface was prepared by critical point drying and subsequent shadowing with platinum and carbon.

Letter p954

IMAGE: PHILIP DANNHAUSER (MEDICAL SCHOOL HANNOVER)

COVER DESIGN: KAREN MOORE

Editorial

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Thesis

  • The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

    • Christian Martin
    Thesis
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Research Highlights

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News & Views

  • High-transmission metasurfaces based on elliptical silicon rods provide a simple approach to engineering the phase and polarization of light.

    • Rashid Zia
    News & Views
  • The basic building block of a Hund's metal can be constructed from an iron atom adsorbed on a platinum surface and can be probed with a scanning tunnelling microscope.

    • Cyrus F. Hirjibehedin
    News & Views
  • The photocurrent generated at the boundary between structural phases of bismuth ferrite reveals information on the coupling between mechanical and electrical phenomena.

    • Sergei V. Kalinin
    • Anna N. Morozovska
    News & Views
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Perspective

  • Recent theoretical advances are starting to elucidate how natural systems use dissipative self-assembly to build their complex nanomachinery and might point to ways in which the same principles can be exploited to fabricate analogous artificial nanoassemblies.

    • Jeremy L. England
    Perspective
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Review Article

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Letter

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Article

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In the Classroom

  • Philip S. Lukeman and Stefan Howorka provide a training programme to improve the interdisciplinary breadth and depth of a nanoscience research group.

    • Philip S. Lukeman
    • Stefan Howorka
    In the Classroom
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