Next-generation GRAB sensors for monitoring dopaminergic activity in vivo

Latest Research

  • Article |

    O-Pair search identifies O-glycopeptides and localizes O-glycosites using a fragment-ion-indexed open modification search combined with a graph-based approach. It also introduces a classification scheme to unify data reporting for glycoproteomics.

    • Lei Lu
    • , Nicholas M. Riley
    • , Michael R. Shortreed
    • , Carolyn R. Bertozzi
    •  & Lloyd M. Smith
  • Article |

    Red and improved green versions of the genetically encoded dopamine sensor GRABDA have been developed. These neurotransmitter sensors are used alone or in combination with, for example, calcium sensors in behaving fruit flies and rodents.

    • Fangmiao Sun
    • , Jingheng Zhou
    • , Bing Dai
    • , Tongrui Qian
    • , Jianzhi Zeng
    • , Xuelin Li
    • , Yizhou Zhuo
    • , Yajun Zhang
    • , Yipan Wang
    • , Cheng Qian
    • , Ke Tan
    • , Jiesi Feng
    • , Hui Dong
    • , Dayu Lin
    • , Guohong Cui
    •  & Yulong Li
  • Article |

    This work repurposes the Type I-C Cascade–Cas3 system from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to achieve large deletions in bacterial genomes.

    • Bálint Csörgő
    • , Lina M. León
    • , Ilea J. Chau-Ly
    • , Alejandro Vasquez-Rifo
    • , Joel D. Berry
    • , Caroline Mahendra
    • , Emily D. Crawford
    • , Jennifer D. Lewis
    •  & Joseph Bondy-Denomy

News & Comment

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Expanding the CRISPR Toolbox

The CRISPR-Cas9 system is best known for its ability to knock out or replace specific genes, via targeted cleavage of the genome. But scientists are developing many more applications, typically by using an inactive Cas9 to target other enzymes to specific genomic sites. From transcriptional regulation to base editing, these developments are extending the range of biological questions that can be probed with CRISPR/Cas9.

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