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Volume 15 Issue 4, April 2016

Mechanical metamaterials can display exceptional strength due to their small sizes. Now, a nanoscale lattice of glassy carbon, fabricated by shrinking a microscale lattice, has demonstrated a compressive strength of up to 3 GPa.

Article p438; News & Views p373

IMAGE: JENS BAUER, KIT

COVER DESIGN: TULSI VORALIA

Volume 15 Issue 4

Editorial

  • Basic hurdles in materials modelling, such as access to experimental raw data, thwart fast progress. Governmental and grass-roots initiatives have stepped up to help overcome current limitations.

    Editorial

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Commentary

  • Nucleic acid memory has a retention time far exceeding electronic memory. As an alternative storage media, DNA surpasses the information density and energy of operation offered by flash memory.

    • Victor Zhirnov
    • Reza M. Zadegan
    • William L. Hughes
    Commentary
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Interview

  • Angelos Michaelides, Professor in Theoretical Chemistry at University College London (UCL) and co-director of the Thomas Young Centre (TYC), explains to Nature Materials the challenges in materials modelling and the objectives of the TYC.

    • David Ciudad
    Interview
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News & Views

  • Fabrication of an ultra-strong glassy carbon nanolattice with a strut diameter of around 200 nm could stimulate the realization of advanced nanoscale architected materials.

    • Xiaoyan Li
    • Huajian Gao
    News & Views
  • Coherent scattering of helium wave packets captures molecular motion with nanometre and picosecond resolution.

    • Florian Klappenberger
    News & Views
  • Macroscopic deformation can induce chirality in initially achiral nanoparticle composites, and reversibly modulate their chiroptical properties.

    • Daeyeon Lee
    • Sang Eon Han
    News & Views
  • Surfaces with slippery asymmetric bumps significantly increase water droplet condensation and shedding.

    • Manu Prakash
    News & Views
  • A plant-inspired approach can be used to print hydrogels that dynamically change shape on immersion in water in order to yield prescribed complex structures.

    • Michael D. Dickey
    News & Views
  • Materials simulations have become a dominant force in the world of science and technology. The intellectual challenges lying ahead to sustain such a paradigm shift are discussed.

    • Nicola Marzari
    News & Views
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Review Article

  • Optical transparency, tunable conducting properties and easy processability make metal oxides key materials for advanced optoelectronic devices. This Review discusses recent advances in the synthesis of these materials and their use in applications.

    • Xinge Yu
    • Tobin J. Marks
    • Antonio Facchetti
    Review Article
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Letter

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Article

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