Liquid biopsies in colorectal cancer

Rethinking evidence in medicine

We present a series on evidence in medicine discussing new approaches to assess the safety and efficacy of cutting-edge health technologies and treatments.

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  • BoP

    The Burden of Proof Studies from the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation provide a new method for assessing the cumulative strength of available evidence for risk factors and associated health outcomes. Intended to complement existing tools for assessing evidence these studies will inform development clinical guidelines and health policy.

  • Cancer

    Nature Medicine presents a special Focus dedicated to the future of cancer research and care. We take stock of the latest exciting developments, as well as the challenges, gaps and inequities that must be resolved as we navigate the cancer research landscape of the next decade.

  • Crab, the avatar of cancer.

    Read about the latest advances in translational and clinical research, selected by the Nature Medicine editorial team.

Nature Medicine is a Transformative Journal; authors can publish using the traditional publishing route OR via immediate gold Open Access.

Our Open Access option complies with funder and institutional requirements.

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  • A large study finds that offering cash for vaccination does not have unintended negative consequences — providing much-needed data and alleviating some longstanding concerns.

    • Karen O’Leary
    Research Highlight
  • The US Food and Drug Administration should address health misinformation through existing and new regulatory approaches, including modernizing product labeling, investing in infodemic surveillance and addressing the roles of the internet and social media.

    • Kushal T. Kadakia
    • Adam L. Beckman
    • Harlan M. Krumholz
    Comment
  • We are launching a series on evidence in medicine, to discuss new approaches to assessing the safety and efficacy of cutting-edge health technologies and treatments.

    Editorial
  • Artificial intelligence algorithms have had mixed success in health, in part because regulation prevents them from evolving at the necessary rate.

    • David W. Bates
    World View

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