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Volume 14 Issue 10, October 2021

Volume 14 Issue 10

Coastal ice cap dynamics

Greenland’s peripheral low-lying glaciers and ice caps are currently losing mass, but during the past two millennia may have responded to warming by growing larger. This image shows a helicopter slinging a load of ice cores off the 2,000-metre summit of the Nuussuaq Peninsula ice cap, coastal west Greenland.

See Osman et al.

Image: Sarah Das, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Cover Design: Valentina Monaco

Editorial

  • Editorial |

    Marine microbes have shaped the climate throughout Earth’s history. Integration of microbial carbon cycling dynamics across a range of spatial scales will be critical for understanding the ocean’s impact in light of a changing climate.

Comment

  • Comment |

    A more comprehensive understanding of the role of irrigation in coupled natural–human systems is needed to minimize the negative consequences for climate, ecosystems and public health.

    • Sonali Shukla McDermid
    • Rezaul Mahmood
    • Zoe Lieberman

Q&A

  • Q&A |

    We chat with Vincent Ialenti, a University of Southern California Berggruen Fellow, about thinking on geological timescales. Ialenti’s recent book, Deep Time Reckoning (MIT Press, 2020), chronicles his anthropological work on the institution responsible for the long-term safety of a Finnish nuclear waste repository.

    • James Super

News & Views

  • News & Views |

    Northern autumns and winters are getting warmer, and their weather is also getting blander. Observations and climate model simulations reveal that human activities have managed to make today’s weather measurably different than it was only a generation ago.

    • Dáithí A. Stone

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