Collections

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    The use and development of sophisticated computing capabilities to analyse and solve real-world, challenging problems has undoubtedly revolutionized the way researchers do science.

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    Close to the end of its mission, the Dawn spacecraft performed high resolution observations of Occator crater at Ceres in order to study its bright points (faculae) at unprecedented detail. These observations establish Ceres as an ocean world.

    Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI/LPI
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    Soil organic carbon is a large component of the global carbon cycle.

    Image: Dahlhaus Kniese / Alamy Stock Photo
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    Recent years have been an exciting time to unravel the mysteries of planetary interiors. A number of ongoing international space missions, ever evolving new technologies and numerical methods, and re-analysis of existing data are allowing us to gain new insights on the internal structures of planetary bodies.

    Image: From closest to furthest (or right to left) respectively: Jupiter (Juno perijove 6, Credit:NASA/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran); Saturn during the great storm of 2010–2011 (Cassini, Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute); Uranus and Neptune (Hubble, Credits: NASA/ESA/A. Simon (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), and M.H. Wong and A. Hsu (University of California, Berkeley)).
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    NASA’s InSight lander arrived on Mars in late 2018. Primarily a geophysics mission, InSight aims to constrain the planet’s present-day geologic activity and its interior evolution.

    Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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    The Arctic is warming much faster than the rest of the planet, a phenomenon called Arctic amplification.

    Image: imageBROKER / Alamy Stock Photo
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    Deep carbon refers to the carbon found beneath the subsurface of the Earth, where ninety percent of the Earth’s carbon resides.

    Image: Cigdem Simsek / Alamy Stock Photo
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    We present this Collection of research, review and comment from Nature Research to celebrate the award of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics to James Peebles “for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology” and to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz “for the discovery of an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star”. Together, these discoveries have changed the way we view the Universe, and our place within it.

    Image: Springer Nature/The Nobel Foundation/Imagesource
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    Ice-rich planetary objects are geologically complex and diverse. Some harbour potentially habitable subsurface water oceans, so these bodies are a priority for further exploration.

    Image: credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
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    On 31 December 2018, NASA’s Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft began to orbit the asteroid (101955) Bennu, a near-Earth asteroid believed to harbour organic molecules and hydrated minerals.

    Image: NASA/OSIRIS-REx/OCAMS
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    A number of enormously destructive fires raged around the globe in 2018.

    Image: Kathryn Capaldo / Alamy Stock Photo
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    This evolving collection draws together content from Nature Climate Change, Nature Geoscience, Nature Communications and Nature to provide comment on how research might best inform decisions about limiting climate warming as well as presenting pertinent new research that addresses this very question.

    Image: Mark Airs / Alamy Stock Photo