Published online 7 November 2007 | Nature 450, 148 (2007) | doi:10.1038/450148b
Corrected online: 9 November 2007

News in Brief

Argo system makes a splash with final float

Floating vote: crew onboard the Kaharoa deploy the 3,000th device in the Argo network.Floating vote: crew onboard the Kaharoa deploy the 3,000th device in the Argo network.Photo courtesy of Alan Blacklock/NIWA

A global network of floats gauging the vital signs of the world's oceans was completed last week, with the launch of the 3,000th device.

Buoy-like floats in the Argo project periodically dive to depths of 2,000 metres, where they drift for 10 days recording temperatures, salinity and current velocity, and then surface — sending the data to a satellite for transmission to a central repository (see Nature 415, 954–955; 2002). More than 30 nations in the Argo system will use the data to create ocean profiles, which then will be monitored for changes over time.

Eight years after deployments began, the New Zealand research vessel Kaharoaon 1 November dropped what were designated as the final floats at latitude 45° south in the southern Pacific Ocean. 

Corrected:

The picture credit on this piece was incorrect in the print edition.
Commenting is now closed.