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Volume 21 Issue 3, March 2018

Volume 21 Issue 3

A circuit for object exploration

Kim and colleagues discovered a medial preoptic circuit involved in mediating behavioral responses toward nonsocial objects and prey.

See Park et al. 21, 364–372 (2018)

Image: Photograph by Yoon-Jung Nam. Cover Design: Erin Dewalt.

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    Using a series of functional manipulation and in vivo recording tools, Park et al. identify a pathway from medial preoptic CaMKIIα-expressing neurons to the ventral periaqueductal gray that mediates object craving and prey hunting.

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