multicellular bacteria looking like caterpillars

Evolution of longitudinal division in multicellular bacteria

Sammy Nyongesa, Philipp Weber et al. study cell shape and cell division in a family of bacteria, some of which divide in unusual ways and form caterpillar-like multicellular structures… in your mouth!

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Subjects within Physical sciences

  • Vertical exchange in the ocean is an important conduit connecting the surface to the deep and influences the distributions of gases, nutrients, pollutants, and other tracers. Here the authors using high-resolution observations and numerical simulations of the ocean fronts in the Northern Gulf of Mexico reveal that the interaction between the fronts and land-sea breeze creates slantwise pathways for water parcels and induces significant subduction of surface water and upwelling of bottom water.

    • Lixin Qu
    • Leif N. Thomas
    • Jonathan D. Nash
    Article Open Access

Subjects within Earth and environmental sciences

  • Transcriptome-wide association studies (TWAS) often ignore the specificity and sharing of effects across contexts (e.g., tissues). Here, the authors describe a method to split genetic effects into context-shared and context-specific terms. They apply their method to tissue and single-cell RNA-seq and show improved power in TWAS.

    • Mike Thompson
    • Mary Grace Gordon
    • Noah Zaitlen
    Article Open Access
  • Manganese has a crucial role in cGAS-STING-mediated DNA sensing and has emerged as a STING agonist. Here the authors report the design and characterization of a nanosystem incorporating manganese ions and the chemotherapeutic drug β-lapachone, inducing T-cell mediated anti-tumor immune responses in preclinical cancer models.

    • Xuan Wang
    • Yingqi Liu
    • Zhong Luo
    Article Open Access
  • The regulation of plasma glucose levels is effected by insulin. Here, the authors reveal atomic detail of how peptides distinct from insulin bind to and activate the insulin receptor, with implications for design of small-molecule insulin mimetics.

    • Nicholas S. Kirk
    • Qi Chen
    • Michael C. Lawrence
    Article Open Access
  • Management of ulcerative colitis can require a combination of treatments targeting different pathways. Here the authors design a therapy for ulcerative colitis based on a multitargeted genetic circuit to simultaneously target TNF-α, B7-1 and integrin α4, and show the therapy is effective in male mice with induced or spontaneous genetic colitis.

    • Xinyan Zhou
    • Mengchao Yu
    • Xi Chen
    Article Open Access

Subjects within Biological sciences

  • Iceland has used four different SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in various combinations. Here, the authors describe differences in the immune responses elicited by different initial/booster vaccine combinations, and then use population-level data to assess the effects of booster doses against Delta and Omicron infection.

    • Gudmundur L. Norddahl
    • Pall Melsted
    • Kari Stefansson
    Article Open Access
  • The neural substrates of depression may differ by sex. Here the authors show that depression is associated with distinct brain connectivity changes in men and in women that are explained by sex-specific transcriptomic signatures involving genes previously implicated in synapse function, immune signalling, and depression risk.

    • Aleksandr Talishinsky
    • Jonathan Downar
    • Conor Liston
    Article Open Access
  • Manganese has a crucial role in cGAS-STING-mediated DNA sensing and has emerged as a STING agonist. Here the authors report the design and characterization of a nanosystem incorporating manganese ions and the chemotherapeutic drug β-lapachone, inducing T-cell mediated anti-tumor immune responses in preclinical cancer models.

    • Xuan Wang
    • Yingqi Liu
    • Zhong Luo
    Article Open Access
  • Management of ulcerative colitis can require a combination of treatments targeting different pathways. Here the authors design a therapy for ulcerative colitis based on a multitargeted genetic circuit to simultaneously target TNF-α, B7-1 and integrin α4, and show the therapy is effective in male mice with induced or spontaneous genetic colitis.

    • Xinyan Zhou
    • Mengchao Yu
    • Xi Chen
    Article Open Access
  • Matye el al. show that coenzyme-A and glutathione deficiency in NAFLD limits fatty acid oxidation and antioxidant defence capacity. The nutrient sensing transcription factor EB induces autophagy–lysosome proteolysis and methionine cycle-transsulfuration to maintain hepatic cysteine, coenzyme-A and glutathione availability.

    • David Matye
    • Sumedha Gunewardena
    • Tiangang Li
    Article Open Access

Subjects within Health sciences

  • This research quantifies the role of zero deforestation policies and potential leakages in Brazilian soybean production, the third major driver of deforestation globally. Here the authors provide the first estimates of net global avoided soy-driven deforestation from zero-deforestation import restrictions and find that such restrictions could help avoid ~40% of deforestation for soy cultivation in Brazil and ~2% of global deforestation.

    • Nelson Villoria
    • Rachael Garrett
    • Kimberly Carlson
    Article Open Access
  • The singlet fission mechanism is still not relatively well understood, except for polyacenes. Here, the authors demonstrate that in diketopyrrolopyrrole supramolecular assemblies, both singlet fission and intersystem crossing can simultaneously happen.

    • Nilabja Maity
    • Woojae Kim
    • Satish Patil
    Article Open Access
  • Wood used in construction stores carbon and reduces the emissions from steel and cement production. Transformation to timber cities while protecting forest and biodiversity is possible without significant increase in competition for land.

    • Abhijeet Mishra
    • Florian Humpenöder
    • Alexander Popp
    Article Open Access
  • Selecting economic policies to achieve sustainable development is challenging due to the many sectors involved and the trade-offs implied. Artificial intelligence combined with economy-wide computer simulations can help.

    • Mohammed Basheer
    • Victor Nechifor
    • Julien J. Harou
    Article Open Access

Subjects within Scientific community and society

  • Adolescence is marked by heightened stress exposure and psychopathology, but also vast potential for opportunity. We highlight how researchers can leverage both developmental and individual differences in stress responding and corticolimbic circuitry to optimize interventions during this unique developmental period.

    • Dylan G. Gee
    • Lucinda M. Sisk
    • Nessa V. Bryce
    Comment Open Access
  • Over the last two and a half years, Nature Communications has received thousands of submissions related to the COVID-19 pandemic and accepted hundreds for publication. To showcase the breadth and quality of this work, we are now launching a COVID-19 Collection, and here we reflect on our editorial processes during this period.

    Editorial Open Access
  • Most organelles move bidirectionally on microtubule tracks, yet how this opposing movement is regulated by kinesin and dynein remains unclear. Recent work found that ARL8, a known anterograde adaptor linking the lysosome to kinesin, also links lysosomes to the retrograde motor dynein, providing key insight into bidirectional organelle movement in cells.

    • Agnieszka A. Kendrick
    • Jenna R. Christensen
    Comment Open Access
  • Advances in geospatial and Machine Learning techniques for large datasets of georeferenced observations have made it possible to produce model-based global maps of ecological and environmental variables. However, the implementation of existing scientific methods (especially Machine Learning models) to produce accurate global maps is often complex. Tomislav Hengl (co-founder of OpenGeoHub foundation), Johan van den Hoogen (researcher at ETH Zürich), and Devin Routh (Science IT Consultant at the University of Zürich) shared with Nature Communications their perspectives for creators and users of these maps, focusing on the key challenges in producing global environmental geospatial datasets to achieve significant impacts.

    Q&A Open Access
  • Chirality of magnons is an intrinsic degree of freedom that characterizes the handedness of spin precession around its equilibrium direction. This commentary summarizes recent progress on spin pumping by ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic heterostructures. In particular, the commentary highlights one fundamental issue in spin pumping: the chirality dependence of the spin current.

    • Z. Q. Qiu
    Comment Open Access
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