Skip to main content

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

Volume 8 Issue 8, August 2018

End of Antartic Isolation?

Genomic and oceanographic data show that floating debris, including rafts of living marine organisms, can cross the Southern Ocean and wash up on Antarctic beaches. Fronds of southern bull kelp (Durvillaea Antarctica, a non-Antarctic species recently found in Antarctica) floating on the surface of the ocean at Marion Island are pictured on the cover.

See Fraser et al. and Putman.

Image: Ceridwen Fraser. Cover Design: Tulsi Voralia.

Volume 8 Issue 8

Editorial

  • It is increasingly clear that achieving the Paris Agreement goal of limiting warming to well below 2 °C will require radical decarbonization, the prospects of which have become closely tied to carbon pricing.

    Editorial

    Advertisement

Top of page ⤴

Comment

  • With country-specific development objectives and constraints, multiple market failures and limited international transfers, carbon prices do not need to be uniform across countries, but must be part of broader policy packages.

    • Chris Bataille
    • Céline Guivarch
    • Henri Waisman
    Comment
  • Low-probability, high-consequence climate change events are likely to trigger management responses that are based on the demand for immediate action from those affected. However, these responses may be inefficient and even maladaptive in the long term.

    • Sarah E. Anderson
    • Ryan R. Bart
    • Matthew Wibbenmeyer
    Comment
  • A well-defined relationship between global mean sea-level rise and cumulative carbon emissions can be used to inform policy about emission limits to prevent dangerous and essentially permanent anthropogenic interference with the climate system.

    • Peter U. Clark
    • Alan C. Mix
    • David J. Wrathall
    Comment
  • Climate change-driven alterations in storminess pose a significant threat to global capture fisheries. Understanding how storms interact with fishery social-ecological systems can inform adaptive action and help to reduce the vulnerability of those dependent on fisheries for life and livelihood.

    • Nigel C. Sainsbury
    • Martin J. Genner
    • Rachel A. Turner
    Comment
Top of page ⤴

Books & Arts

Top of page ⤴

Research Highlights

Top of page ⤴

News & Views

  • Political crises may exacerbate environmental conflicts by shifting conservation priorities. Research now shows that increased carbon emissions from deforestation in Brazil may compromise its goals under the Paris Agreement.

    • Otavio Cavalett
    News & Views
  • The coincident reduction of Arctic sea ice with increasing mid-latitude wintertime extremes has motivated much research on Arctic–mid-latitude linkages. A new study reveals that projected Antarctic sea-ice loss could also impact the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes through perturbations to the strength and position of the westerly winds.

    • Yannick Peings
    News & Views
  • Will the Southern Ocean’s relentless waves undo Antarctica’s ecological isolation? The discovery of a wayward piece of kelp and a simple numerical experiment set new expectations for the potential invasion of Earth’s most isolated continent.

    • Nathan F. Putman
    News & Views
  • Protecting and restoring forests to mitigate climate change also promises to help protect tropical biodiversity and ecosystem services. Analysis now shows that optimizing for carbon can come at the expense of protecting biodiversity, but there are ways to effectively pair the two.

    • Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira
    News & Views
Top of page ⤴

Perspectives

Top of page ⤴

Letters

Top of page ⤴

Articles

Top of page ⤴

Amendments & Corrections

Top of page ⤴

Search

Quick links