Editorials

  • Editorial |

    In our very first issue, eight scientists shared their visions for how they thought chemistry would develop and now, ten years on, we have asked another group of researchers to look to the future. We also take this opportunity to look back and reflect on a decade of Nature Chemistry.

  • Editorial |

    We reflect on our monthly ‘In Your Element’ feature that comes to an end in this issue.

  • Editorial |

    The United Nations has declared 2019 to be the International Year of the Periodic Table to coincide with this iconic chemical chart turning 150 years old. We join in with the celebrations by publishing a collection of articles that explore the edges of the periodic system and look at some of the elements that do — and don’t — make up the table.

  • Editorial |

    Encoded chemical libraries can be used to screen a vast array of compounds against a protein target to identify potent binders. A collection of articles in this issue discuss different methods to increase the chemical space sampled by encoded macrocycle libraries and the advantages that such libraries offer for discovering new drug leads.

  • Editorial |

    Our understanding of actinide chemistry lags behind that of the rest of the periodic table. A collection of articles in this issue highlights recent progress featuring uranium(VI) dianions bearing four U–N multiple bonds, berkelium(IV) stabilized in solution and delocalization of 5f electrons in a plutonium material.

  • Editorial |

    The launch of Nature Chemistry in 2009 prompted some criticism of journal proliferation, but 100 issues later this young offender has matured into an accepted part of the publishing landscape.

  • Editorial |

    A range of mechanisms have evolved for communicating information across cell membranes, but designing synthetic analogues is far from trivial. A collection of articles in this issue discuss different methods of passing chemical information across lipid bilayers using artificial systems.

  • Editorial |

    There are many unanswered questions regarding how the biomolecules and biomechanical processes that define life came to be. A collection of Articles in this issue show how intermediates in RNA synthesis might have formed and how the initiation and evolution of RNA replication might have occurred.

  • Editorial |

    Taking chemical technology from the bench to the consumer is a formidable challenge, but it is how research can ultimately benefit wider society. Companies are now beginning to incorporate metal–organic frameworks into commercial products, heralding a new era for the field.

  • Editorial |

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signalling molecule in biological systems, but it is unclear exactly how it interacts with some metalloproteins. Now, a collection of articles in this issue reveal how NO binds to proteins containing type-1 copper sites.

  • Editorial |

    Chemistry research and education face challenges anywhere in the world, but more so in less developed — or less stable — economies. These countries and their more economically fortunate neighbours can all contribute to the development of chemistry and its ability to tackle local and global issues.

  • Editorial |

    The modification of proteins with fluorophores, drugs and polymers is required for many applications, yet conjugation reactions often generate a heterogeneous mixture of products. A collection of articles in this issue focuses on methods to modify proteins in a site-selective manner.

  • Editorial |

    The field of molecular electronics has developed significantly as experimental techniques to study charge transport through single molecules have become more reliable. Three Articles in this issue highlight how chemists can now better understand and control electronic properties at the molecular level.

  • Editorial |

    A collection of articles in this issue focuses on attempts to mimic aspects of natural-product biosynthesis for the identification of new drugs.

  • Editorial |

    As Nature Chemistry celebrates its fifth birthday, we take a look at some of the facts and figures that underpin the story of the journal so far.

  • Editorial |

    A collection of articles in this issue focuses on the chemical origin of life — how simple molecules present on the early Earth could have evolved into the complex dynamic biochemistry that we know today.

  • Editorial |

    Nature Chemistry signed up for a Twitter account in March 2009. More than 5,000 tweets later, what have we learned and how do we use it?

  • Editorial |

    A collection of articles in this issue focuses on the ability to selectively perform a reaction at just one specific site in a complex molecule that contains many other similarly reactive sites.

  • Editorial |

    Structure by structure, more information is steadily being gathered on how small molecules bind to DNA. A better understanding of the interactions involved in such processes will be crucial for the successful design of compounds for specific diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  • Editorial |

    Disagreements are common in science and can lead to better understanding, but must be handled carefully.

  • Editorial |

    Can you imagine scientific meetings without poster sessions?

  • Editorial |

    To join in with the International Year of Chemistry celebrations, we launched a competition earlier this year inviting aspiring science communicators to write an essay about one of seven elements.

  • Editorial |

    With more and more scientific articles and journals being published, how can you effectively keep abreast of new research relevant to your own projects?

  • Editorial |

    Including pictorial summaries of each article on the table-of-contents pages of a journal makes it just that little bit easier to browse — rather than search — the scientific literature.

  • Editorial |

    When it comes to research misconduct, burying one's head in the sand and pretending it doesn't exist is the worst possible plan.

  • Editorial |

    Who is the greatest chemist of all time?

  • Editorial |

    The United Nations has proclaimed 2011 to be the International Year of Chemistry. Under this banner, chemists should seize the opportunity to highlight the rich history and successes of our subject to a much broader audience — and explain how it can help to solve the global challenges we face today and in the future.

  • Editorial |

    Revising a manuscript in response to the comments of referees should not be about doing the bare minimum to get a paper published. Addressing criticisms that are genuine and constructive can lead to much more compelling research articles.

  • Editorial |

    Experimental data is the foundation on which science is built. Providing easier ways to find and search it is one way in which new online technologies can help to advance research.

  • Editorial |

    Press embargoes of research articles can serve journals, researchers and journalists — as long as everyone plays by, and understands, the rules.

  • Editorial |

    The importance of an up to date and easy to find website should not be underestimated by scientists looking to establish links to others in their community — and represents good value for relatively little effort.

  • Editorial |

    Chemistry lacks the easily articulated grand challenges associated with physics or biology, and it generally gets a rough ride in the mainstream media. All the more reason that it needs effective advocates and champions.

  • Editorial |

    Twitter is more than just the place to go to find out what celebrities have had for breakfast — if you look hard enough, it can be a useful source of chemistry news, highlights and debate.

  • Editorial |

    As the beautiful game once again takes to the world stage this summer, it is worth remembering that 2010 also marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the professional debut of a very tiny football.

  • Editorial |

    Although politics has been defined as the 'science of government', there is little science in government. Recent events in UK politics have highlighted the lack of scientifically literate elected representatives — a situation that must change for the good of society.

  • Editorial |

    Cuts in pharmaceutical R&D jobs might provide short-term improvements to the bottom line, but do not bode well for the industry in the long run.

  • Editorial |

    Is any experiment worth your health — or your life?

  • Editorial |

    As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words, but when that picture appears on the front cover of a scientific journal, that estimate is probably a little on the low side.

  • Editorial |

    The financial crisis that continued to grip the world in 2009 has brought the question of who should pay for scientific research — and what it should set out to achieve — into sharper focus than ever.

  • Editorial |

    The editorial process at Nature Chemistry differs in some important ways from that employed at other chemistry journals.

  • Editorial |

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2009 was awarded for research into the structure and function of the ribosome, sparking debate about its significance to chemists.

  • Editorial |

    Perceived lapses in the peer-review process often receive a lot of attention, but the majority of researchers declare themselves satisfied with the system. But if it is broken, how do we fix it?

  • Editorial |

    The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will soon be awarded amid the usual speculation, angst, disagreement and elation — but is it really worth all the fuss?

  • Editorial |

    Are the days of print journals numbered — and if they are, what will that mean for how we interact with the scientific literature?

  • Editorial |

    Another 'superheavy' element is officially welcomed to the table.

  • Editorial |

    Why Nature Chemistry spells sulfur with an 'f'.

  • Editorial |

    There are many different criteria that can be taken into account when judging the scientific success of individual researchers, but are some more meaningful than others?