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Volume 27 Issue 9, September 2009

Fluorescently tagged nucleotides (small white 'dots') bound to complementary bases on immobilized single DNA molecules provide the backdrop for this image. With four week-long runs on one instrument, Pushkarev et al. sequence an individual's genome (p 847). Credits: Erin Dewalt, based on "One in a million" by Dimitri Vervitsiotis/Getty Images

Volume 27 Issue 9

Editorial

  • As the cost of human genome sequencing plunges and large-scale genome-phenotype studies become possible, society should do more to reward those individuals who choose to disclose their data, despite the risks.

    Editorial

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News

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Data Page

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News Feature

  • Jane Qiu investigates the thriving business of selling stem cell transplants as cure-alls for debilitating diseases.

    • Jane Qiu
    News Feature
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Bioentrepreneur

  • Business plan competitions can earn you more than a plaque for the wall and a pat on the back—they can provide start-up money, experience and the attention your idea needs to get off the ground.

    • Raymond Sekula
    • Sasha Bakhru
    • Stefan Zappe
    Bioentrepreneur
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Correspondence

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Feature

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Patents

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News & Views

  • Advances in parallelization allow a human genome to be sequenced using single-molecule technology.

    • Yingrui Li
    • Jun Wang
    News & Views
  • Systemic delivery of an siRNA–aptamer chimera leads to prostate cancer regression in mice.

    • Ivanka Toudjarska
    • Antonin de Fougerolles
    News & Views
  • Engineered zinc-finger nucleases are used to generate several genetically modified pluripotent stem cell lines.

    • Andrew G Elefanty
    • Edouard G Stanley
    News & Views
  • Mass spectrometry can now measure the absolute concentrations of the majority of cellular proteins without labeling.

    • Christine Vogel
    • Edward M Marcotte
    News & Views
  • The massive capacity of today's sequencing machines can be harnessed efficiently by sequencing pooled samples and decoding the results.

    • Nick Patterson
    • Stacey Gabriel
    News & Views
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Research Highlights

    • Kathy Aschheim
    • Laura De Francesco
    • Craig Mak
    Research Highlights
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Analysis

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Article

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Letter

  • Pushkarev et al. present the first human genome sequence obtained using single-molecule sequencing technology. These results demonstrate that human genome sequencing—previously the turf of large sequencing centers—is now within reach of an individual lab in a matter of weeks.

    • Dmitry Pushkarev
    • Norma F Neff
    • Stephen R Quake
    Letter
  • Hockemeyer et al. demonstrate targeted genetic modification of three genes in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells using zinc-finger nucleases delivered on plasmids. They use the approach to generate a reporter cell line that monitors the pluripotent state, a drug-inducible overexpression system, and a reporter cell line for a gene that is not expressed in pluripotent stem cells.

    • Dirk Hockemeyer
    • Frank Soldner
    • Rudolf Jaenisch
    Letter
  • Gene-specific changes in DNA methylation are promising biomarkers, but sensitive quantitative detection of these epigenetic marks remains challenging. Li et al. adapt the so-called BEAMing technology to enable high-throughput digital quantification of gene methylation in clinical samples.

    • Meng Li
    • Wei-dong Chen
    • Bert Vogelstein
    Letter
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Corrigendum

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Erratum

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Careers and Recruitment

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