The Francis Crick Institute

Postdoctoral Training Fellow

The Francis Crick Institute

Londond, United Kingdom

Job title: Postdoctoral Training Fellow

Location: The Francis Crick Institute, Midland Road, London

Contract: Fixed-term, 4 years

Full time

Salary: Competitive with benefits, subject to skills and experience

Vacancy ID: 10346

Short summary

We are looking for a motivated postdoctoral research fellow to join the Cellular Signalling and Cytoskeletal Function laboratory run by Michael Way at the Francis Crick Institute (https://michaelway0.wixsite.com/waylab). The position represents an exciting opportunity to be part of an established research group in a pioneering and innovative biomedical research institute, that has excellent facilities for light and electron microscopy and computation. The successful candidate will be expected to drive their own independent research programme to investigate the ultra-structural organization and role of septin and clathrin in vaccinia virus assembly and egress using live cell imaging and cryo-electron microscopy. Applicants should have a PhD in cell and/or molecular biology with a background in membrane trafficking, structure and/or electron microscopy.

Project scope

We have recently shown that during its exit from the cell, Vaccinia virus recruits septins and clathrin immediately following it fusion with the plasma membrane prior to inducing actin polymerization (Humphries et al., 2012; Snetkov et al., 2016; Pfanzelter et al., 2018). Septins act as a restriction factor to suppress viral exit from the cell (Pfanzelter et al., 2018). In contrast, clathrin enhances viral spread by promoting actin assembly (Humphries et al., 2012; Snetkov et al., 2016). The proposed project aims to use live cell imaging and cryo-electron microscopy based approaches to understand the regulation and assembly of septins and clathrin on the virus. The candidate will also investigate the wider role of clathrin and membrane trafficking in virus assembly, the molecular details of which still remain to be fully understood. 

Pfanzelter et al., 2018. Septins suppress the release of Vaccinia virus from infected cells. J. Cell Biol. 217:2911-2929. 

Snetkov et al., 2016. NPF motifs in the vaccinia virus protein A36 recruit intersectin-1 to promote Cdc42:N-WASP-mediated viral release from infected cells. Nature Microbiology 1:16141. 

Humphries et al., 2012. Clathrin potentiates vaccinia-induced actin polymerization to facilitate viral spread. Cell Host and Microbe 12: 346-359.

About us

The Francis Crick Institute is a biomedical discovery institute dedicated to understanding the fundamental biology underlying health and disease. Its work is helping to understand why disease develops and to translate discoveries into new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat illnesses such as cancer, heart disease, stroke, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.

An independent organisation, its founding partners are the Medical Research Council (MRC), Cancer Research UK, Wellcome, UCL (University College London), Imperial College London and King’s College London.

The Crick was formed in 2015, and in 2016 it moved into a new state-of-the-art building in central London which brings together 1500 scientists and support staff working collaboratively across disciplines, making it the biggest biomedical research facility under in one building in Europe.

The Francis Crick Institute will be world-class with a strong national role. Its distinctive vision for excellence includes commitments to collaboration; developing emerging talent and exporting it the rest of the UK; public engagement; and helping turn discoveries into treatments as quickly as possible to improve lives and strengthen the economy.

  • If you are interested in applying for this role, please apply via our website.
  • The closing date for applications is 25 April 2019 at 23:30.
  • All offers of employment are subject to successful security screening and continuous eligibility to work in the United Kingdom.

Please apply via recruiter’s website.

Favorite