The University of Arizona (Arizona)

Postdoctoral position in microbiota and autoimmunity

Hsin-Jung Joyce Wu

Tucson, AZ, United States

Position Description: 

A postdoctoral position is available in spring (or summer) 2020 in the Department of Immunobiology at the University of Arizona to work on NIH-funded studies regarding the roles of gut commensal bacteria in the development of autoimmune disease.


The Wu lab has a strong focus on both systemic and mucosal immunology. We aim to understand the immunomodulation and immunometabolic role of human pathobionts or mouse commensals in the development of gut-distal autoimmune diseases including autoimmune arthritis, skin, and lung pathology (e.g. inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue/iBALT) by using murine arthritis models and human patients samples. Below are examples of our exciting projects that were published in the past:


•          Immunity 2016, 44:875-888 “Gut Microbiota Drive Autoimmune Arthritis by Promoting Differentiation and Migration of Peyer’s Patch T Follicular Helper Cells”


·     Cell Host & Microbe 2017, 22:697-704.e4. “Segmented filamentous bacteria provoke lung autoimmunity by inducing gut-lung axis Th17 Cells expressing dual TCRs”

 

Seeking a highly motivated recent (or soon to be) Ph.D. graduate with an immunology background. Experience with flow cytometry and mouse models is highly desired.


How to apply: Applicants should email a cover letter stating your qualifications, interests, and career goals, as well as a CV with the contact information of 2-3 references directly to

Dr. Hsin-Jung Joyce Wu,

Email: joycewu@email.arizona.edu


Application Deadline:

•   Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.


More details regarding the Wu lab’s research interest can be found at https://immunobiology.arizona.edu/profile/hsin-jung-joyce-wu-phd


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Postdoctoral position in microbiota and autoimmunity