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Volume 543 Issue 7643, 2 March 2017

In this special issue on human migration, Nature investigates the facts behind the headlines on migration and speaks to refugee and immigrant scientists. Vivek Wadhwa celebrates the foreign-born entrepreneurs who have brought jobs and wealth to America. And Hubb Dijstelbloem and Gemma Galdon-Clavel highlight ethical issues around the increasing use of technology to track peoples movements. Cover art: Alberto Seveso

Editorial

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World View

  • Researchers must seek out others’ deposited biological sequences in community databases, urges Franziska Denk.

    • Franziska Denk
    World View
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Research Highlights

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Seven Days

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News

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Correction

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News Feature

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Comment

  • Monitoring technologies only add to the political noise over managing mobility, warns Huub Dijstelbloem.

    • Huub Dijstelbloem
    Comment
  • Gemma Galdon Clavell calls for checks and balances to avoid the indiscriminate sharing of personal data.

    • Gemma Galdon Clavell
    Comment
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Books & Arts

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Correspondence

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News & Views

  • A remarkable composite material has been made that mimics the structure of tooth enamel. This achievement opens up the exploration of new composite materials and of computational methods that reliably predict their properties. See Letter p.95

    • Horacio D. Espinosa
    • Rafael Soler-Crespo
    News & Views
  • Many organ surfaces are covered by a protective epithelial-cell layer. It emerges that such layers are maintained by cell stretching that triggers cell division mediated by the force-sensitive ion-channel protein Piezo1. See Letter p.118

    • Carl-Philipp Heisenberg
    News & Views
  • Rocks are subjected to increased pressure as they are buried during subduction. Contrary to general belief, a study suggests that peak pressures recorded in subducted rocks might not reflect their maximum burial depths.

    • Kip V. Hodges
    News & Views
  • Ageing is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease caused by the rupture of inflamed cholesterol plaques in arteries. It emerges that this might be partly due to genetic mutations that cause cancerous changes in white blood cells.

    • Alan R. Tall
    • Ross L. Levine
    News & Views
  • A supersolid is a paradoxical and elusive state of matter that has been sought for more than 60 years. Two experiments have now observed its characteristic signatures in ultracold quantum matter. See Letters p.87 & p.91

    • Kaden R. A. Hazzard
    News & Views
  • Immune cells known as T cells can destroy tumour cells, but their clinical use requires complex preparation and the cells can lose effectiveness over time. A new approach might improve the efficiency of T-cell therapy. See Letter p.113

    • Marcela V. Maus
    News & Views
  • The biosynthesis of a coenzyme in the microbial production of methane has been determined — completing the biosynthetic pathways for the family of compounds that includes chlorophyll, haem and vitamin B12. See Article p.78

    • Tadhg P. Begley
    News & Views
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Review Article

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Article

  • The genomes of 102 primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours have been sequenced, revealing mutations in genes with functions such as chromatin remodelling, DNA damage repair, mTOR activation and telomere maintenance, and a greater-than-expected contribution from germ line mutations.

    • Aldo Scarpa
    • David K. Chang
    • Sean M. Grimmond
    Article
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Letter

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Erratum

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Corrigendum

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Erratum

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Toolbox

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Feature

  • Political change is causing scientists worldwide to worry about how immigration law might affect their ability to do research.

    • Chris Woolston

    Collection:

    Feature
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Career Brief

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Correction

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Futures

  • Parting is such sweet sorrow.

    • Bo Balder
    Futures
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