Volume 535 Issue 7611, 14 July 2016

Outlook

  • Outlook |

    • Michelle Grayson

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    We can't live without it, but many of us struggle to live with it. Pain has an essential biological function, but too much — or the wrong sort — ruins lives and puts a sizeable dent in economic productivity. By David Holmes, infographic by Mohamed Ashour.

    • David Holmes

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    The dearth of treatment options for chronic pain has led to widespread over-prescription of strong opioids. But some innovative thinking is building a promising pipeline.

    • James Mitchell Crow

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    Pain researchers' arguments for using only male rodents in preclinical pain research don't hold up to scrutiny, says Jeffrey S. Mogil.

    • Jeffrey S. Mogil

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    Technology for peering into the brain is revealing a pattern of pain, and differences between the acute and chronic forms.

    • Simon Makin

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    People with neuropathic pain have struggled to find relief with conventional drugs. Researchers are investigating whether more meaningful pain classifications could help.

    • Michael Eisenstein

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    Although genetics studies have so far failed to revolutionize pain treatments, some researchers think that a host of discoveries are just around the corner.

    • Eryn Brown

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    Armed with a clearer understanding of how placebos work, researchers are suggesting that inactive substances might be used to mitigate chronic pain.

    • Jo Marchant

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    The 'war on drugs' has left many in developing nations with no access to strong painkillers. But governments in these countries are learning to stop worrying and love the poppy.

    • Lucas Laursen

    Nature Outlook:

  • Outlook |

    For thousands of years people have sought explanations for pain and ways to ease it. Despite a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the sensation, much remains baffling, and the search for better treatments continues. By Stephanie Pain

    • Stephanie Pain

    Nature Outlook:

Editorial

World View

  • World View |

    The focus on impact of published research has created new opportunities for misconduct and fraudsters, says Mario Biagioli.

    • Mario Biagioli

Research Highlights

Seven Days

  • Seven Days |

    Dwarf planet discovered beyond Neptune; unprecedented mangrove deaths linked to climate change; and French scientists protest against pick for top agriculture post.

News

Correction

News Feature

Comment

  • Comment |

    Beate El-Chichakli and colleagues outline principles for coordinating bio-based industries to achieve many of the sustainable development goals.

    • Beate El-Chichakli
    • , Joachim von Braun
    • , Christine Lang
    • , Daniel Barben
    •  & Jim Philp

Summer Books

  • Summer Books |

    As labs and lecture halls empty, go out of this world with our regular reviewers' recommendations for stellar holiday reading.

    • Michael D. Gordin
    • , John M. Marzluff
    • , Joan B. Silk
    • , Matthew Cobb
    • , Jennifer Rohn
    • , Diane Coyle
    • , Jill Cook
    •  & Adrian Woolfson

Correspondence

Obituary

  • Obituary |

    Psychologist who shaped ideas about perception, cognition and education.

    • Patricia Marks Greenfield

News & Views

  • News & Views |

    Certain bacteria contain strings of magnetic nanoparticles and therefore align with magnetic fields. Inspired by these natural structures, researchers have now fabricated synthetic one-dimensional arrays of such particles.

    • Damien Faivre
    •  & Mathieu Bennet
  • News & Views |

    Observations of the disk of dust and gas around a nascent star reveal that the distance from the star at which water in the disk forms ice is variable. This variation might hinder the formation of planets. See Letter p.258

    • Brenda Matthews
  • News & Views |

    Quantum effects have been used in devices that measure various quantities, but not to measure electric fields. The sensitivity of an electrometer has now been boosted using the phenomenon of quantum superposition. See Letter p.262

    • Charles S. Adams
  • News & Views |

    The role of Ki-67 in mitotic cell division has been a mystery. Extensive imaging reveals that this highly positively charged protein coats chromosomes to prevent them from coalescing. See Letter p.308

    • Clifford P. Brangwynne
    •  & John F. Marko
  • News & Views |

    At what times of year are phenological events across species sensitive to climatic variables, and how sensitive are they? Answers to these questions emerge from the analysis of a wealth of long-term data sets. See Article p.241

    • Marcel E. Visser

Futures

Letter

  • Letter |

    Electronic transport measurements in a magnetic field on the topological Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 identify the predicted Weyl orbits that weave Fermi arcs and bulk states together; the Weyl orbits enable transfer of chirality from one node to another, and open up the possibility of controlling topological properties electronically.

    • Philip J. W. Moll
    • , Nityan L. Nair
    • , Toni Helm
    • , Andrew C. Potter
    • , Itamar Kimchi
    • , Ashvin Vishwanath
    •  & James G. Analytis
  • Letter |

    The structure and accretion modes of two end-member types of oceanic lithosphere are described using a detailed seismicity survey along 390 kilometres of an ultraslow ridge axis, indicating deeper seismicity in amagmatic regions and explaining the uneven crustal production at ultraslow-spreading ridges.

    • Vera Schlindwein
    •  & Florian Schmid
  • Letter |

    Live imaging and single-cell analyses are used to show that decision-making by differentiating haematopoietic stem cells between the megakaryocytic–erythroid and granulocytic–monocytic lineages is not initiated by stochastic switching between the lineage-specific transcription factors PU.1 and GATA1, which challenges the previous model of early myeloid lineage choice.

    • Philipp S. Hoppe
    • , Michael Schwarzfischer
    • , Dirk Loeffler
    • , Konstantinos D. Kokkaliaris
    • , Oliver Hilsenbeck
    • , Nadine Moritz
    • , Max Endele
    • , Adam Filipczyk
    • , Adriana Gambardella
    • , Nouraiz Ahmed
    • , Martin Etzrodt
    • , Daniel L. Coutu
    • , Michael A. Rieger
    • , Carsten Marr
    • , Michael K. Strasser
    • , Bernhard Schauberger
    • , Ingo Burtscher
    • , Olga Ermakova
    • , Antje Bürger
    • , Heiko Lickert
    • , Claus Nerlov
    • , Fabian J. Theis
    •  & Timm Schroeder
  • Letter |

    A highly sensitive electrometer is reported that is based on a Schrödinger-cat state in a Rydberg atom, that reaches a sensitivity beyond the standard quantum limit and can compete with state-of-the-art electric field measurements performed using electromechanical resonators and single-electron transistors.

    • Adrien Facon
    • , Eva-Katharina Dietsche
    • , Dorian Grosso
    • , Serge Haroche
    • , Jean-Michel Raimond
    • , Michel Brune
    •  & Sébastien Gleyzes
  • Letter |

    During cell division, chromosomes are maintained as individual units; this process is shown to be mediated by the cell proliferation marker Ki-67, which has biophysical properties similar to those of surfactants.

    • Sara Cuylen
    • , Claudia Blaukopf
    • , Antonio Z. Politi
    • , Thomas Müller-Reichert
    • , Beate Neumann
    • , Ina Poser
    • , Jan Ellenberg
    • , Anthony A. Hyman
    •  & Daniel W. Gerlich
  • Letter |

    The snow-line is the distance from a protostar at which a particular volatile gas condenses; images of the protostar V883 Ori suggest that the water snow-line migrated outwards during a protostellar outburst, with implications for our understanding of the formation of planetary systems such as our own.

    • Lucas A. Cieza
    • , Simon Casassus
    • , John Tobin
    • , Steven P. Bos
    • , Jonathan P. Williams
    • , Sebastian Perez
    • , Zhaohuan Zhu
    • , Claudio Caceres
    • , Hector Canovas
    • , Michael M. Dunham
    • , Antonio Hales
    • , Jose L. Prieto
    • , David A. Principe
    • , Matthias R. Schreiber
    • , Dary Ruiz-Rodriguez
    •  & Alice Zurlo
  • Letter |

    The zebrafish cloche gene is required for the formation of most endothelial and haematopoietic cells, however, it has been difficult to isolate; this study reveals that cloche encodes a PAS-domain-containing bHLH transcription factor, and a mammalian orthologue can partially rescue cloche mutants, indicating a possible conserved role in mammals.

    • Sven Reischauer
    • , Oliver A. Stone
    • , Alethia Villasenor
    • , Neil Chi
    • , Suk-Won Jin
    • , Marcel Martin
    • , Miler T. Lee
    • , Nana Fukuda
    • , Michele Marass
    • , Alec Witty
    • , Ian Fiddes
    • , Taiyi Kuo
    • , Won-Suk Chung
    • , Sherveen Salek
    • , Robert Lerrigo
    • , Jessica Alsiö
    • , Shujun Luo
    • , Dominika Tworus
    • , Sruthy M. Augustine
    • , Sophie Mucenieks
    • , Björn Nystedt
    • , Antonio J. Giraldez
    • , Gary P. Schroth
    • , Olov Andersson
    •  & Didier Y. R. Stainier
  • Letter |

    Butterflies diversify their retinal mosaics by producing three stochastic types of ommatidia instead of the two types found in Drosophila; this study shows that butterfly retinas use two R7-like photoreceptors per ommatidium that each make an independent stochastic decision to express the transcription factor Spineless, which controls photoreceptor and ommatidial fate.

    • Michael Perry
    • , Michiyo Kinoshita
    • , Giuseppe Saldi
    • , Lucy Huo
    • , Kentaro Arikawa
    •  & Claude Desplan
  • Letter |

    Activity in regions of the brain have been correlated with decision making but determining whether such relationships are correlative or causative has been challenging; using a technique to reversibly inactivate brain areas in monkeys reveals that although there is decision-related activity in the lateral intraparietal (LIP) area, LIP is not critical for the perceptual decisions studied here.

    • Leor N. Katz
    • , Jacob L. Yates
    • , Jonathan W. Pillow
    •  & Alexander C. Huk
  • Letter |

    In mice, deficiency in the high-density lipoprotein gene T39 stabilizes liver X receptor (LXR), reducing both atherosclerosis and steatohepatitis, suggesting that T39 inhibition could be an effective strategy for reducing these diseases.

    • Joanne Hsieh
    • , Masahiro Koseki
    • , Matthew M. Molusky
    • , Emi Yakushiji
    • , Ikuyo Ichi
    • , Marit Westerterp
    • , Jahangir Iqbal
    • , Robin B. Chan
    • , Sandra Abramowicz
    • , Liana Tascau
    • , Shunichi Takiguchi
    • , Shizuya Yamashita
    • , Carrie L. Welch
    • , Gilbert Di Paolo
    • , M. Mahmood Hussain
    • , Jay H. Lefkowitch
    • , Daniel J. Rader
    •  & Alan R. Tall
  • Letter |

    Analysis of the transcriptome of more than 1,200 cells from gastrulating mouse embryos using single-cell sequencing, gathering unexpected insights into early mesoderm formation during gastrulation.

    • Antonio Scialdone
    • , Yosuke Tanaka
    • , Wajid Jawaid
    • , Victoria Moignard
    • , Nicola K. Wilson
    • , Iain C. Macaulay
    • , John C. Marioni
    •  & Berthold Göttgens

Brief Communications Arising

  • Brief Communications Arising |

    • Claire Feeney
    • , Gregory P. Scott
    • , James H. Cole
    • , Magdalena Sastre
    • , Anthony P. Goldstone
    •  & Robert Leech
  • Brief Communications Arising |

    • John Collinge
    • , Zane Jaunmuktane
    • , Simon Mead
    • , Peter Rudge
    •  & Sebastian Brandner

Article

  • Article |

    An ambitious study has used more than 10,000 datasets to examine how the phenological characteristics—such as the timing of reproduction—of various taxa alter in response to climate change, and suggests that differing levels of climate sensitivity could lead to the desynchronization of seasonal events over time.

    • Stephen J. Thackeray
    • , Peter A. Henrys
    • , Deborah Hemming
    • , James R. Bell
    • , Marc S. Botham
    • , Sarah Burthe
    • , Pierre Helaouet
    • , David G. Johns
    • , Ian D. Jones
    • , David I. Leech
    • , Eleanor B. Mackay
    • , Dario Massimino
    • , Sian Atkinson
    • , Philip J. Bacon
    • , Tom M. Brereton
    • , Laurence Carvalho
    • , Tim H. Clutton-Brock
    • , Callan Duck
    • , Martin Edwards
    • , J. Malcolm Elliott
    • , Stephen J. G. Hall
    • , Richard Harrington
    • , James W. Pearce-Higgins
    • , Toke T. Høye
    • , Loeske E. B. Kruuk
    • , Josephine M. Pemberton
    • , Tim H. Sparks
    • , Paul M. Thompson
    • , Ian White
    • , Ian J. Winfield
    •  & Sarah Wanless
  • Article |

    This paper reports the identification of a new cereblon-modulating agent, CC-885, which targets the translation termination factor GSPT1 and demonstrates anti-tumour activity in patient-derived tumour cells; the crystal structure of the cereblon–DDB1–GSPT1–CC-885 complex reveals a common motif for cereblon-substrate recruitment.

    • Mary E. Matyskiela
    • , Gang Lu
    • , Takumi Ito
    • , Barbra Pagarigan
    • , Chin-Chun Lu
    • , Karen Miller
    • , Wei Fang
    • , Nai-Yu Wang
    • , Derek Nguyen
    • , Jack Houston
    • , Gilles Carmel
    • , Tam Tran
    • , Mariko Riley
    • , Lyn’Al Nosaka
    • , Gabriel C. Lander
    • , Svetlana Gaidarova
    • , Shuichan Xu
    • , Alexander L. Ruchelman
    • , Hiroshi Handa
    • , James Carmichael
    • , Thomas O. Daniel
    • , Brian E. Cathers
    • , Antonia Lopez-Girona
    •  & Philip P. Chamberlain
  • Article |

    Disparate modes of suppression of the let-7 microRNA family are selectively and inversely related in neuroblastoma.

    • John T. Powers
    • , Kaloyan M. Tsanov
    • , Daniel S. Pearson
    • , Frederik Roels
    • , Catherine S. Spina
    • , Richard Ebright
    • , Marc Seligson
    • , Yvanka de Soysa
    • , Patrick Cahan
    • , Jessica Theißen
    • , Ho-Chou Tu
    • , Areum Han
    • , Kyle C. Kurek
    • , Grace S. LaPier
    • , Jihan K. Osborne
    • , Samantha J. Ross
    • , Marcella Cesana
    • , James J. Collins
    • , Frank Berthold
    •  & George Q. Daley

Feature

Career Brief

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