Skip to main content

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

Volume 532 Issue 7597, 7 April 2016

Mental-health disorders are the leading causes of disability worldwide, and the efforts of the World Health Organization and other international bodies in recent years have succeeded in raising political awareness of the fact. In a Comment piece on page 25 of this issue of Nature, Pamela Collins and Shekhar Saxena underline the importance of harnessing that global concern into global action. To that end, they offer six practical suggestions � encompassing logistics, training, clinical interventions and public health measures � for how we can meet the mental-health needs of vulnerable people everywhere. One high-profile growth area is that of smart-phone apps. But as pointed out in a News Feature on page 20, app technology is moving a lot faster than the medical science supporting it. Cover art: Oliver Munday

Editorial

  • The first outbreak of yellow fever in Angola in almost 30 years illustrates the danger of a short attention span when confronting epidemic threats.

    Editorial

    Advertisement

  • To boost nuclear security, research reactors must eliminate highly enriched uranium.

    Editorial
  • Mental illness is moving up the global agenda — but there is still much to do.

    Editorial
Top of page ⤴

World View

  • A professional body for UK social scientists can help to improve research practice — and not just in public engagement, says Andrew Webster.

    • Andrew Webster
    World View
Top of page ⤴

Research Highlights

Top of page ⤴

Seven Days

Top of page ⤴

Correction

Top of page ⤴

News

Top of page ⤴

Correction

Top of page ⤴

News Feature

Top of page ⤴

Comment

Top of page ⤴

Spring Books

  • Highlights of this season's releases

    • Emily Banham
    Spring Books
  • Alan Thorpe enjoys a hymn to some of the founders of the science and institutions of weather forecasting.

    • Alan Thorpe
    Spring Books
  • Gregor Macdonald applauds a biography of prescient geologist and energy theorist Marion King Hubbert.

    • Gregor Macdonald
    Spring Books
  • Lori Andrews assesses Henry Greely's treatise on how technology will oust reproductive intimacy.

    • Lori Andrews
    Spring Books
Top of page ⤴

Correspondence

Top of page ⤴

Correction

Top of page ⤴

News & Views

  • Detailed measurements of radioisotopes in deep-sea deposits, plus modelling of how they reached Earth, indicate that many supernovae have occurred near enough to have potentially influenced evolution. See Letters p.69 & p.73

    • Adrian L. Melott
    News & Views
  • A protein fragment released by filaments of the fungus Candida albicans destroys host cells. This is the first demonstration that human fungal pathogens other than moulds can release toxic peptides. See Article p.64

    • Aaron P. Mitchell
    News & Views
  • An analysis of changes in island topography and climate that have occurred since the last glacial maximum 21,000 years ago shows how sea-level change has influenced the current biodiversity of oceanic islands. See Letter p.99

    • José María Fernández-Palacios
    News & Views
  • A reconstruction of 1,200 years of water's history in the Northern Hemisphere, based on proxy data, fuels the debate about whether anthropogenic climate change affected twentieth-century precipitation. See Letter p.94

    • Matthew E. Kirby
    News & Views
  • A clever dissection of the roles of the Ptchd1 gene in the brains of mice demonstrates one way to untangle the complex relationships between the causes and symptoms of neurodevelopmental disorders. See Article p.58

    • Scott Bolkan
    • Joshua A. Gordon
    News & Views
  • A high-throughput approach has found clusters of DNA double-strand breaks in neural cells. Most of the clusters are in large genes that are associated with neural function, which suggests that the breaks may have tissue-specific roles.

    • Thomas W. Glover
    • Thomas E. Wilson
    News & Views
Top of page ⤴

Perspective

  • The potential of soils to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions has not been exploited; here we discuss and recommend research and technology developments to implement mitigation practices.

    • Keith Paustian
    • Johannes Lehmann
    • Pete Smith
    Perspective
Top of page ⤴

Article

  • Increased activity of dopamine receptor type-2 (D2R)-expressing cells in the nucleus accumbens of rats during a ‘decision’ period reflects a ‘loss’ outcome of the previous decision, and predicts a subsequent safe choice; by artificially increasing the activity of D2R neurons during the decision period, risk-seeking rats could be converted to risk-avoiding rats.

    • Michael F. Wells
    • Ralf D. Wimmer
    • Michael M. Halassa
    Article
  • This study identifies a cytolytic peptide toxin in the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans—the peptide is both a crucial virulence factor that permeabilizes the host cell plasma membrane and a key signal that triggers a host danger response pathway.

    • David L. Moyes
    • Duncan Wilson
    • Julian R. Naglik
    Article
Top of page ⤴

Letter

  • 60Fe in deep-ocean crusts indicates that two supernovae exploded in the solar neighbourhood, reheating the superbubble that harbours our Solar System; calculations of the trajectories and masses of the supernova progenitors gives their explosion times and sites, 90–100 parsecs away, with masses around nine times the solar mass, at 2.3 and 1.5 million years ago, respectively.

    • D. Breitschwerdt
    • J. Feige
    • B. Fuchs
    Letter
  • A feedback-control algorithm implemented using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond is demonstrated; the algorithm uses coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback and protects the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise, making it stable for milliseconds.

    • Masashi Hirose
    • Paola Cappellaro
    Letter
  • Ab initio calculations are used to determine the contribution of quantum fluctuations to the crystal structure of the high-pressure superconducting phase of H3S and D3S; the quantum nature of the proton is found to fundamentally change the superconducting phase diagram of H3S.

    • Ion Errea
    • Matteo Calandra
    • Francesco Mauri
    Letter
  • Insects are captured by the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata when they ‘aquaplane’ on the wet rim, or ‘peristome’, of the plant’s pitcher organ; here it is shown that unidirectional water flow is crucial to the complete wetting of the peristome, and that the underlying mechanism involves multiscale structural features.

    • Huawei Chen
    • Pengfei Zhang
    • Lei Jiang
    Letter
  • Enantiospecific total synthesis of (+)-phorbol in only 19 steps from the abundant monoterpene (+)-3-carene is demonstrated using a two-phase terpene synthesis strategy.

    • Shuhei Kawamura
    • Hang Chu
    • Phil S. Baran
    Letter
  • A very large set of proxy data is used to reconstruct Northern Hemisphere hydroclimate variability over the past twelve centuries, to benchmark climate model simulations of hydroclimate; the twentieth-century intensification of hydroclimate extremes seen in the model simulations is not supported by the proxy reconstruction.

    • Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist
    • Paul J. Krusic
    • David Frank
    Letter
  • Relatively rapid changes in island area, isolation and connectivity observed since the Last Glacial Maximum have had measurable effects on present-day biodiversity, with formerly larger and less well connected islands having a greater number of endemic species.

    • Patrick Weigelt
    • Manuel Jonas Steinbauer
    • Holger Kreft
    Letter
  • Haploid human embryonic stem cells have been derived from haploid oocytes, the cells maintain a normal haploid karyotype as pluripotent cells and, unexpectedly, as differentiated cells — loss-of-function genetic screens previously performed with haploid embryonic stem cells in mice can now be performed in humans.

    • Ido Sagi
    • Gloryn Chia
    • Nissim Benvenisty
    Letter
  • Thalidomide and its derivative lenalidomide bind the CRL4CRBN E3 ubiquitin ligase and target protein substrates for degradation; structural and functional data determined here show that casein kinase 1α and the lymphoid transcription factor Ikaros, the efficacy targets of lenalidomide in two different blood cancers, interact with the CRBN–lenalidomide interface through a β-hairpin destruction motif.

    • Georg Petzold
    • Eric S. Fischer
    • Nicolas H. Thomä
    Letter
  • The crystal structures of the protease domain of separase are reported, showing how separase recognizes cohesin, and how phosphorylation of the cleavage site enhances separase activity.

    • Zhonghui Lin
    • Xuelian Luo
    • Hongtao Yu
    Letter
Top of page ⤴

Toolbox

Top of page ⤴

Feature

  • An aisle too narrow, a lab bench too high: the scientific world is a complex place for researchers with disabilities. But many of them find ingenious ways to make it work.

    • Eryn Brown
    Feature
Top of page ⤴

Career Brief

Top of page ⤴

Futures

Top of page ⤴
Nature Briefing

Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily.

Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing

Search

Quick links