Volume 431 Issue 7011, 21 October 2004

Editorial

  • Editorial |

    Should scientists let the public help them decide how government research funds are spent? Yes they should, because the consequences are to be welcomed, not feared.

News

News in Brief

Features

  • News Feature |

    Antibiotics are failing and drug companies have all but stopped developing new ones. Will conquered diseases come back to haunt us? Martin Leeb examines one plan to avert the crisis.

    • Martin Leeb
  • News Feature |

    Employing genetic diagnosis to avoid having a baby with a disability is controversial enough. But a minority of deaf people would consider testing to ensure that they had a deaf child. Carina Dennis finds out why.

    • Carina Dennis

Correspondence

Commentary

Autumn Books

Essay

    Concept

  • Essay |

    Co-evolution: Earth history involves tightly entwined transitions of information and the environment, but where is this process heading?

    • T. M. Lenton
    • , H. J. Schellnhuber
    •  & E. Szathmáry

News & Views

  • News & Views |

    Just over three years ago, it was announced that a first draft of the human genome sequence had been completed. Gaps and errors remained, but the job of fixing those problems is now largely done.

    • Lincoln D. Stein
  • News & Views |

    The genome of a second pufferfish species has been sequenced. Why is this important? Because comparing this genome with that of other animals yields a wealth of information on genome evolution.

    • John Mulley
    •  & Peter Holland
  • News & Views |

    According to a prediction of general relativity, the spinning mass of the Earth affects the motion of satellites. A measurement of this ‘frame-dragging’ effect confirms Einstein's theory.

    • Neil Ashby
  • News & Views |

    The discovery of a protein that regulates the production of antibody-generating B cells has implications for our understanding of how cancers of the immune system develop — and how they might be treated.

    • Louis M. Staudt
  • News & Views |

    Data from Europe in 1940–42, and simulations of severe El Niño events, suggest that the effects of such events can be unexpectedly far-reaching. The stratosphere could be a key player in this behaviour.

    • William J. Randel

Research Highlights

Brief Communications

Analysis

Articles

  • Article |

    • Olivier Jaillon
    • , Jean-Marc Aury
    • , Frédéric Brunet
    • , Jean-Louis Petit
    • , Nicole Stange-Thomann
    • , Evan Mauceli
    • , Laurence Bouneau
    • , Cécile Fischer
    • , Catherine Ozouf-Costaz
    • , Alain Bernot
    • , Sophie Nicaud
    • , David Jaffe
    • , Sheila Fisher
    • , Georges Lutfalla
    • , Carole Dossat
    • , Béatrice Segurens
    • , Corinne Dasilva
    • , Marcel Salanoubat
    • , Michael Levy
    • , Nathalie Boudet
    • , Sergi Castellano
    • , Véronique Anthouard
    • , Claire Jubin
    • , Vanina Castelli
    • , Michael Katinka
    • , Benoît Vacherie
    • , Christian Biémont
    • , Zineb Skalli
    • , Laurence Cattolico
    • , Julie Poulain
    • , Véronique de Berardinis
    • , Corinne Cruaud
    • , Simone Duprat
    • , Philippe Brottier
    • , Jean-Pierre Coutanceau
    • , Jérôme Gouzy
    • , Genis Parra
    • , Guillaume Lardier
    • , Charles Chapple
    • , Kevin J. McKernan
    • , Paul McEwan
    • , Stephanie Bosak
    • , Manolis Kellis
    • , Jean-Nicolas Volff
    • , Roderic Guigó
    • , Michael C. Zody
    • , Jill Mesirov
    • , Kerstin Lindblad-Toh
    • , Bruce Birren
    • , Chad Nusbaum
    • , Daniel Kahn
    • , Marc Robinson-Rechavi
    • , Vincent Laudet
    • , Vincent Schachter
    • , Francis Quétier
    • , William Saurin
    • , Claude Scarpelli
    • , Patrick Wincker
    • , Eric S. Lander
    • , Jean Weissenbach
    •  & Hugues Roest Crollius

Letters

Naturejobs

Erratum

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