Reviews & Analysis

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  • The initial events that give rise to pancreatic cancer are not fully understood. Evidence from mice now implicates the enzyme Tert in setting the stage for the formation of this type of tumour.

    • Laura D. Wood
    • Anirban Maitra
    News & Views
  • The protein UTX regulates the DNA–protein complex chromatin to suppress tumour growth. Data suggest that the ability of UTX to condense into liquid-like droplets underlies its chromatin-regulating ability.

    • David Lara-Astiaso
    • Brian J. P. Huntly
    News & Views
  • Layered perovskites are useful materials that contain sheets of a perovskite semiconductor enclosed by organic molecules. Crystals of layered perovskites that include sheets of a second inorganic lattice can now be grown from solution.

    • Roman Krahne
    • Milena P. Arciniegas
    News & Views
  • What role might seafood have in boosting human health in diets of the future? A modelling study that assesses how a rise in seafood intake by 2030 might affect human populations worldwide offers a way to begin to answer this.

    • Lotte Lauritzen
    News & Views
  • Nature’s pages feature a look at psychology in industrial workplaces, and a mystery surrounding fish in a Swiss lake.

    News & Views
  • Tiny flakes of metal suspended in a solution have been observed to self-assemble into pairs separated by a narrow gap — offering a tunable system for studying combinations of light and matter known as polaritons.

    • Johannes Feist
    News & Views
  • An analysis of plant–pollinator interactions reveals that the presence of abundant plant species favours the pollination of rare species. Such asymmetric facilitation might promote the coexistence of species in diverse plant communities.

    • Marcelo A. Aizen
    News & Views
  • This Review discusses the state of the art of interface optics—including refractive optics, meta-optics and moiré engineering—for the control of van der Waals polaritons.

    • Qing Zhang
    • Guangwei Hu
    • Cheng-Wei Qiu
    Review Article
  • This Perspective outlines the Human Developmental Cell Atlas initiative, which uses state-of-the-art technologies to map and model human development across gestation, and discusses the early milestones that have been achieved.

    • Muzlifah Haniffa
    • Deanne Taylor
    • Matthias Zilbauer
    Perspective
  • Nature’s pages feature a book review of Moby-Dick, and a look at the job market for PhDs in 1971.

    News & Views
  • The Arabian Peninsula was a key migratory crossroads when humans and our hominin relatives began to leave Africa. Archaeological evidence and climate reconstructions reveal episodes when early humans inhabited Arabia.

    • Robin Dennell
    News & Views
  • Benzene rings are almost unbreakable in typical reaction conditions. Chemistry has now been developed that selectively breaks these rings open, highlighting their potential as building blocks for making open-chain molecules.

    • Mark R. Crimmin
    News & Views
  • Future progress in computing calls for innovative ways to map the physical characteristics of materials to the logic functions needed by computing architectures. An electronic device called a molecular memristor provides a way forward.

    • Matthew J. Marinella
    • A. Alec Talin
    News & Views
  • Nature’s pages feature a look back at the life of Lawrence Bragg, and a call for London to erect a statue of Louis Pasteur.

    News & Views
  • Cells continually acquire mutations and pass them on to their progeny. The mutation profiles of human cells shine a light on the cells’ developmental history and their dynamics in adult tissue.

    • Kamila Naxerova
    News & Views
  • Laser-cooled ions have been used to substantially lower the temperature of a proton located several centimetres away. This technique could be useful in ultraprecise measurements of the properties of antimatter particles.

    • Manas Mukherjee
    News & Views
  • Nature’s pages report faltering computer sales in 1971, and share some science questions from a school examination in 1871.

    News & Views