Review, News & Views, Perspectives, Hypotheses and Analyses

  • Nature | News & Views |

    Magnetic materials can host a range of structures called spin textures. Two such textures — a meron and an antimeron — have been observed experimentally for the first time, in a material known as a chiral magnet.

    • Seonghoon Woo
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Bacteria can use specific protein-based strategies to defend individual cells against viruses. Evidence that bacterial small molecules also target viruses provides fresh insights into how bacteria thwart viral infection.

    • Martha R. J. Clokie
  • Nature | News & Views |

    A modified protocol has enabled baboons that received transplanted pig hearts to survive for more than six months. This improvement on previous efforts brings pig-to-human heart transplants a step closer.

    • Christoph Knosalla
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Ammonia emissions harm humans and the environment. An analysis shows that satellites can locate sources precisely, and could thus help to monitor compliance with international agreements to limit such emissions.

    • Mark A. Sutton
    •  & Clare M. Howard
  • Nature | News & Views |

    How Nature reported innovative moving walkways in 1968, and a plea to ban gases as weapons in 1918.

  • Nature | News & Views |

    Intrinsic and extrinsic cues drive dynamic processes that control cell fate during organ development. A study of mouse and human cells reveals how these inputs affect cells that make the essential hormone insulin.

    • Francesca M. Spagnoli
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Astronomical objects called quasars have been difficult to study because of the limited spatial resolution of observations. An approach has been developed that allows the structure and dynamics of quasars to be investigated.

    • Erin Kara
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Viruses can insert a copy of their genetic sequence into a host cell’s genome. If the insertion fails, gene expression of unintegrated viral DNA in the nucleus is silenced. How this process occurs has now been uncovered.

    • Parinaz Fozouni
    •  & Melanie Ott
  • Nature | News & Views |

    The signalling molecule nitric oxide protects the kidneys by reprogramming metabolism, and its levels are regulated by a two-component system in mice. These findings identify new targets for drug discovery.

    • Charles J. Lowenstein
  • Nature | News & Views |

    What Nature said about an oil spill in 1968, and about the survival of science after the First World War.

  • Nature | News & Views |

    In the debate about how bacterial mutations arise, an experiment in 1943 showed that they can occur spontaneously and independently of a selection pressure. This study also popularized the use of maths-driven analysis of biological data.

    • Manoshi S. Datta
    •  & Roy Kishony
  • Nature | News & Views |

    A preference for mating with similar individuals can have a key role in speciation. Research on Darwin’s finches suggests that individuals might use the likeness of their parents as a guide for choosing mates.

    • Lewis G. Spurgin
    •  & Tracey Chapman
  • Nature | News & Views |

    A strategy for using organic free radicals to make light-emitting diodes circumvents the constraints that limit the efficiency with which other organic LEDs convert electric current into light.

    • Tetsuro Kusamoto
    •  & Hiroshi Nishihara
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Aeroplanes use propellers and turbines, and are typically powered by fossil-fuel combustion. An alternative method of propelling planes has been demonstrated that does not require moving parts or combustion.

    • Franck Plouraboué
  • Nature | Perspective |

    This Perspective discusses developments in LED-based solid-state lighting for physiological and agricultural applications, and the anticipated benefits in terms of health and productivity.

    • P. M. Pattison
    • , J. Y. Tsao
    • , G. C. Brainard
    •  & B. Bugbee
  • Nature | News & Views |

    The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of hard-to-treat human infections. It now seems that, if the bacterium is infected by a virus, a viral enzyme helps the microbe to evade detection by the immune system.

    • Michael S. Gilmore
    •  & Ona K. Miller
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Chloroplast organelles in plant cells are thought to have evolved from bacterial cells. It emerges that the protein-import system in chloroplasts arose from components that export proteins out of bacteria.

    • Danny J. Schnell
  • Nature | Perspective |

    The phenomenon of ultralow friction between sliding incommensurate crystal surfaces—structural superlubricity—is examined, and the challenges and opportunities involved in its extension to the macroscale are assessed.

    • Oded Hod
    • , Ernst Meyer
    • , Quanshui Zheng
    •  & Michael Urbakh
  • Nature | News & Views |

    What Nature said about the 1968 flu epidemic and the reinstatement of public weather forecasts in the United Kingdom at the end of the First World War.

  • Nature | News & Views |

    Low oxygen levels are a hallmark of expanding fat tissue in obesity, and can lead to type 2 diabetes. In addition to a lack of adequate blood supply, increased oxygen demand in fat cells now emerges as being key to this harmful state.

    • Nolwenn Joffin
    •  & Philipp E. Scherer
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Measurements of the strength of interactions between the Higgs boson and other particles test the current model of particle physics. A key part of this model has been confirmed by observing the most common decay of the Higgs boson.

    • Boris Tuchming
  • Nature | News & Views |

    The detection of a low-mass exoplanet on a relatively wide orbit has implications for models of planetary formation and evolution, and could open the door to a new era of exoplanet characterization.

    • Rodrigo F. Díaz
  • Nature | News & Views |

    A tectonic plate descending into the Mariana Trench carries sea water deep into Earth’s interior. It seems that much more water enters Earth at this location than was thought — with implications for the global water budget.

    • Donna J. Shillington
  • Nature | News & Views |

    RNA sequencing of thousands of single cells located at the interface between mother and fetus in early pregnancy reveals remarkable complexity in the cell types and regulatory networks that support reproduction.

    • Sumati Rajagopalan
    •  & Eric O. Long
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Have Neanderthals gained an unfair reputation for having led highly violent lives? A comparison of skulls of Neanderthals and prehistoric humans in Eurasia reveals no evidence of higher levels of trauma in these hominins.

    • Marta Mirazón Lahr
  • Nature | News & Views |

    A high-quality genome sequence for the mosquito Aedes aegypti has now been assembled. The sequence will enable researchers to identify genes that could be targeted to keep mosquito populations at bay.

    • Susan E. Celniker
  • Nature | News & Views |

    What Nature said 50 and 100 years ago about record-breaking telescopes and the end of the First World War.

  • Nature | News & Views |

    A natural chemical reaction that occurs below the sea floor makes the amino acid tryptophan without biological input. This finding reveals a process that might have helped life on Earth to begin.

    • John A. Baross
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Understanding the dynamics of quantum systems far from equilibrium is one of the most pressing issues in physics. Three experiments based on ultracold atomic systems provide a major step forward.

    • Michael Kolodrubetz
  • Nature | News & Views |

    What Nature was saying 50 and 100 years ago.

  • Nature | News & Views |

    A nanometre-scale mechanism has been proposed to explain how bacteria improve their grip on human cells. The findings have implications for drug discovery, and might inspire biomimetic applications such as adhesives.

    • John R. Dutcher
  • Nature | News & Views |

    External forces can make cells undergo large, irreversible deformations. It emerges that stretched mammalian cells grown in vitro can enter a state called superelasticity, in which large, reversible deformations occur.

    • Manuel Théry
    •  & Atef Asnacios
  • Nature | News & Views |

    A single-cell sequencing study reveals how different types of neuron are distributed in the brain. An analysis then demonstrates how these data can improve our understanding of neuronal functions.

    • Aparna Bhaduri
    •  & Tomasz J. Nowakowski
  • Nature | News & Views |

    The control of quantum systems offers great potential for advanced information-processing and sensing applications. An approach has been demonstrated that enables such control over the motion of mechanical oscillators.

    • Michael R. Vanner
  • Nature | News & Views |

    The discovery of a mechanism that leads to cancer-therapy resistance highlights the many ways that tumour cells can adapt to survive — and reveals the limitations of categorizing patients by their gene mutations.

    • Katharina Schlacher
  • Nature | News & Views |

    An analysis of data from the Gaia space observatory suggests that stars in the inner halo of the Milky Way originated in another galaxy. This galaxy is thought to have collided with the Milky Way about ten billion years ago.

    • Kim Venn
  • Nature | News & Views |

    What Nature was saying 50 and 100 years ago.

  • Nature | News & Views |

    During development, some synaptic connections between neurons are removed by immune cells called microglia, and others are retained. The discovery of a ‘don’t eat me’ signal that prevents excess pruning sheds light on this process.

    • Serge Rivest
  • Nature | News & Views |

    A gut bacterium has been found to modulate locomotor activity in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This effect is mediated by the level of a sugar and the activity of neurons that produce the molecule octopamine.

    • Angela E. Douglas
  • Nature | News & Views |

    An experiment has measured the energy spectrum of solar neutrinos associated with 99% of the nuclear reactions that power the Sun. The results provide a glimpse into the depths of the solar core.

    • Aldo Serenelli
  • Nature | News & Views |

    A natural material has been discovered that exhibits an extreme optical property known as in-plane hyperbolicity. The finding could lead to infrared optical components that are much smaller than those now available.

    • Thomas G. Folland
    •  & Joshua D. Caldwell
  • Nature | News & Views |

    What Nature was saying 50 and 100 years ago.

  • Nature | News & Views |

    A study has demonstrated the value of using autonomous drones for conservation purposes.

    • Mary Abraham
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Interactions between the B and T cells of the human immune system are implicated in the brain disease multiple sclerosis. It emerges that B cells make a protein that is also made in the brain, and that T cells recognize this protein.

    • Richard M. Ransohoff
  • Nature | News & Views |

    Can the predicted rise in global food demand by 2050 be met sustainably? A modelling study suggests that a combination of interventions will be needed to tackle the associated environmental challenges.

    • Günther Fischer