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Volume 6 Issue 10, October 2021

Volume 6 Issue 10

Quantum bits (qubits) hold promise for the realization of quantum computers, which will surpass classical computers for specific tasks, such as searching large databases or performing quantum chemical computations. Moving forward, materials optimization will be instrumental to improve the performance and scalability of qubits and enable the realization of practical quantum computers. In this focus issue, our collection of articles explores the materials-related challenges and opportunities for different types of qubits, including superconducting, trapped-ion, spin, germanium and topological qubits. See Qubits meet materials science.

Image: Peter Allen. Cover design: Charlotte Gurr.

Editorial

  • Editorial |

    Qubits come in many shapes and forms. Some are better developed, some will make it easier to scale up to big quantum processors and some will require less effort to correct errors. One thing they have in common: they will all benefit from materials optimization.

    Collection:

Comment

Research Highlights

  • In Brief |

    An article in Physical Review Applied reports an architecture based on a ring resonator that supports a network of superconducting qubits with enhanced connectivity and negligible crosstalk.

    • Giulia Pacchioni

    Collection:

  • In Brief |

    An article in Physical Review Letters reports a formalism enabling the use of a D-Wave quantum annealer to sample the equilibrium ensemble of dense polymer mixtures.

    • Giulia Pacchioni

    Collection:

  • In Brief |

    A paper in Nature reports a laser-free method to entangle two trapped-ion qubits that has high fidelity and potential for scalability.

    • Giulia Pacchioni

    Collection:

Reviews

  • Review Article |

    Superconducting qubits hold great promise for quantum computing, and recently there have been dramatic improvements in both coherence times and the power of quantum processors. This Review explores how the path forward involves balancing circuit complexity and materials perfection, eliminating defects while designing qubits with engineered noise resilience.

    • Irfan Siddiqi

    Collection:

  • Review Article |

    Trapped-ion qubits have great potential for quantum computation, but materials improvements are needed. This Review surveys materials opportunities to improve the performance of trapped-ion qubits, from understanding the surface science that leads to electric-field noise to developing methods for building ion traps with integrated optics and electronics.

    • Kenneth R. Brown
    • John Chiaverini
    • Hartmut Häffner

    Collection:

  • Review Article |

    Defect-based spin qubits offer a versatile platform for creating solid-state quantum devices. This Review is a guide for understanding the properties and applications of current spin defects, and provides a framework for designing, engineering and discovering new qubit candidates

    • Gary Wolfowicz
    • F. Joseph Heremans
    • David D. Awschalom

    Collection:

  • Review Article |

    Germanium is a promising material to build quantum components for scalable quantum information processing. This Review examines progress in materials science and devices that has enabled key building blocks for germanium quantum technology, such as hole-spin qubits and superconductor–semiconductor hybrids.

    • Giordano Scappucci
    • Christoph Kloeffel
    • Menno Veldhorst

    Collection:

  • Review Article |

    Topological qubits are attractive because of the potential to store quantum information in a topologically protected manner; however, they are challenging to realize. This Review surveys the recent attempts to realize topological qubits out of materials systems that combine superconductivity, spin–orbit coupling and a magnetic field, and surveys both theoretical ideas and experimental results.

    • Karsten Flensberg
    • Felix von Oppen
    • Ady Stern

    Collection:

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