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  • Chemistry education research is a well-established field that has the potential to inform chemistry teaching at all levels. But to the uninitiated, much of the work can seem descriptive while quantitative studies often suffer from a lack of reproducibility. Here I delve into these characteristics and explain why this should not deter chemistry teachers from engaging.

    • Keith S. Taber
    In the Classroom
  • Providing a stable and reliable supply of electrons is crucial for the future of quantum computing processors. Here, electron withdrawing groups are added to species which improve the flow of electrons.

    • Alexander Rosu-Finsen
    Research Highlight
  • The reduction of molecular species containing arene to alkali metal cation interactions with other alkali metals has been found to contradict the expectation provided by simple considerations of relative reduction potentials.

    • Johannes Kreutzer
    Research Highlight
  • By drawing inspiration from ion transport in biology, researchers have developed highly selective channels for the separation and enrichment of Li+ ions from complex aqueous solutions.

    • Stephanie Greed
    Research Highlight
  • The European BorderSens project leverages voltammetric sensors, developed with end-users’ input, to rapidly and accurately detect illicit drugs. By embracing practicalities and validation, this technology has the potential to combat the illicit drug problem.

    • Robin Van Echelpoel
    • Karolien De Wael
    Down to Business
  • A route to synthetically interesting axially chiral diaryl ethers combines an asymmetric desymmetrization and a kinetic resolution.

    • Stephen G. Davey
    Research Highlight
  • Cable bacteria are able to conduct electrons to interconvert oxygen and water. Here, researchers have isolated the conducting cable bacteria skeletons to demonstrate their activity in an electrochemical cell.

    • Stephanie Greed
    Research Highlight
  • If intense ionizing radiation was present at a time of prebiotic life, protocells would have needed protection. Researchers have shown that peptide-containing coacervates can harbour DNA strands, which can then be coated with Mn-containing coacervates protecting the interior from radiation.

    • Alexander Rosu-Finsen
    Research Highlight
  • To mark the United Nations International Day of Persons with Disabilities we have launched a collection on chemists with disabilities. Within diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) efforts in science, this is a topic that is often overlooked.

    Editorial
  • A new class of adhesive is reported where the two-component glue adheres via electrostatic interactions. The glue works efficiently in wet and dry conditions, while exhibiting reversible properties in acidic and alkaline media.

    • Alexander Rosu-Finsen
    Research Highlight
  • The culture of scientific workplaces can cause neurodiverse scientists to face challenges. However, employing inclusive strategies and practical adjustments to the laboratory and the wider environment can help these differently skilled and equally valuable scientists thrive.

    • Jane Essex
    Comment
  • For blind and low vision chemists to participate independently in the chemistry laboratory we must employ principles of universal design and embrace new technologies mirroring those available outside the lab. By designing a first-year chemistry course that provides non-visual access, we are taking the first step to empower more blind and low vision people to be successful in chemistry careers.

    • Cary A. Supalo
    • Siegbert Schmid
    • Alice Motion
    Comment
  • The participation of people with disabilities in higher education in STEM fields in Japan is significantly lower than the proportion of the general population. Here, I discuss our work building an inclusive laboratory, university initiatives to improve accessibility and explain the need for additional support for researchers with disabilities.

    • Shigehiro Namiki
    Comment
  • A review of Transformer: The Deep Chemistry of Life and Death, where Nick Lane explores the Krebs cycle, a metabolic pathway that is central to biochemistry.

    • Markus Ralser
    Books & Arts
  • Why was the relationship between Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins so fraught? A great deal has been written on the contributions of Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins to determining the double helix structure of DNA. I attempt here to shed some light not on this issue but on their relationship, with the help of university and college records.

    • Stephen Neidle
    Comment
  • In the interstellar medium, complex organic molecules are believed to form on icy dust grains in dark molecular clouds. Research now shows that carbon atoms, previously considered immobile, can diffuse across ice surfaces to take part in reactions with other adsorbed species.

    • Stephanie Greed
    Research Highlight
  • Michael DeGrandpre explains the development and workings of a submersible autonomous moored instrument for alkalinity measurements in marine and freshwater environments.

    • Michael DeGrandpre
    Tools of the Trade
  • The mercury drop test is widely used to distinguish between heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. However, testing the test revealed the unexpected issue of mercury reacting with protected and unprotected catalysts alike, leading to the reliance of this test being questioned.

    • Alexander Rosu-Finsen
    Research Highlight
  • Emily Draper explains how to design and build electrochemical equipment for neutron scattering experiments with simple, at-hand components and techniques.

    • Emily R. Draper
    Tools of the Trade